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The Moral Landscape Audiobook

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values

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Publisher's Summary

Sam Harris’s first book, The End of Faith, ignited a worldwide debate about the validity of religion. In the aftermath, Harris discovered that most people—from religious fundamentalists to nonbelieving scientists—agree on one point: science has nothing to say on the subject of human values. Indeed, our failure to address questions of meaning and morality through science has now become the most common justification for religious faith. It is also the primary reason why so many secularists and religious moderates feel obligated to "respect" the hardened superstitions of their more devout neighbors.

In this explosive new book, Sam Harris tears down the wall between scientific facts and human values, arguing that most people are simply mistaken about the relationship between morality and the rest of human knowledge. Harris urges us to think about morality in terms of human and animal well-being, viewing the experiences of conscious creatures as peaks and valleys on a "moral landscape". Because there are definite facts to be known about where we fall on this landscape, Harris foresees a time when science will no longer limit itself to merely describing what people do in the name of "morality"; in principle, science should be able to tell us what we ought to do to live the best lives possible.

Bringing a fresh perspective to age-old questions of right and wrong and good and evil, Harris demonstrates that we already know enough about the human brain and its relationship to events in the world to say that there are right and wrong answers to the most pressing questions of human life. Because such answers exist, moral relativism is simply false—and comes at increasing cost to humanity. And the intrusions of religion into the sphere of human values can be finally repelled: for just as there is no such thing as Christian physics or Muslim algebra, there can be no Christian or Muslim morality.

©2010 Sam Harris (P)2010 Simon & Schuster, Inc.

What the Critics Say

“Sam Harris breathes intellectual fire into an ancient debate. Reading this thrilling, audacious book, you feel the ground shifting beneath your feet. Reason has never had a more passionate advocate.” (Ian McEwan)

“A lively, provocative, and timely new look at one of the deepest problems in the world of ideas. Harris makes a powerful case for a morality that is based on human flourishing and thoroughly enmeshed with science and rationality. It is a tremendously appealing vision, and one that no thinking person can afford to ignore.” (Steven Pinker, Harvard College Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, and author of How the Mind Works and The Blank Slate)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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  •  
    David Chadwick 11-08-10 Member Since 2017
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    "Schadenfreuder!"

    As the title was ending anxiety arose for I again didn't want it to. So many different thinking points covered and still no Idea where to go from here. I decided to just listen to it again.
    I especially enjoyed the controversial section about the non-existence of 'freewill'. I have come across this previously in physics books but never with a clear concise argument against it as found here in this masterpiece.

    P.S. If you actually read this far and make it here, the title of this review is a meaningless non-sequitur. lol
    Buy this book you will like it regardless of your religious biases...I hope.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 10-31-10 Member Since 2017
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    "The book says what many feel, but fear to say"

    I was expecting an anti-religious dialogue; however, I found myself repeatedly saying, “I feel the same way”.

    The author clearly makes the point that religions have so many contradictions in their message that thinking people cannot understand what the message really is; while others pick and choose what they believe from the contradictions. These people often become a part of the religious fringe that drives so many others from the good things that many religions offer.

    I enjoyed and learned much about religions that I had not known. I also found the Mr. Harris had done his research well when I checked his statements.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Darwin8u Mesa, AZ, United States 09-11-15
    Darwin8u Mesa, AZ, United States 09-11-15 Member Since 2012
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    "Cutting a third path through the Moral Landscape."

    “The fact that millions of people use the term "morality" as a synonym for religious dogmatism, racism, sexism, or other failures of insight and compassion should not oblige us to merely accept their terminology until the end of time.”
    ― Sam Harris, The Moral Landscape

    I've avoided Sam Harris probably from a bit of prejudice. Although I've always enjoyed Christopher Hitchens, I've thought others of the New Atheists a bit shrill. I just assumed Sam Harris was going to be more hammer and less scalpel. I was wrong. I really enjoyed this book. While there is little doubt what Sam Harris feels about religion, his method here is more an attempt to 'cut a third path' through the wilderness between those educated liberals who think there is no universal foundation for human values AND the claim that a universal morality requires the support of faith-based religion. Obviously, being able to criticize religion plays a part of this effort, but Sam Harris (in this book at least) seems more interested in pushing people to think that a scientific approach to morality is at least an important step. I agree. The idea that science has an important thing to say about values and morals is fundamental.

    12 of 19 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William Seattle, WA, United States 10-18-10
    William Seattle, WA, United States 10-18-10
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    "Mind-blowing"

    Although very tough on Catholics, I find the book makes compelling arguments and begins great conversations.

    13 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Douglas 11-24-16
    Douglas 11-24-16 Member Since 2008
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    "In An SJW World Gone Mad..."

    this is the common sense approach to moral behavior. Facts don't care about your feelings, but the facts can, in fact, lead you to right and moral behavior. Dry your eyes, campus kiddies, and read this book.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gare&Sophia Alexandria, VA, United States 10-16-13
    Gare&Sophia Alexandria, VA, United States 10-16-13 Member Since 2012
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    "Science as religion, certainty as science"

    I was really disappointed with this book from the start, but after reading a couple of similar texts I decided to go back and give it a fair hearing. I left with the conclusion that this guy is as inflexible in his thinking as a Nazi. He assumes that his knowledge is complete and infallible, he makes fun of people who don't support his conclusions as apodictic. He makes the same mistakes that the 14th century priests made in believing that the bible contained all knowledge of value. He quotes many studies and hangs on their results as fact, as opposed to pathways.

    My daughter asked me if I believed in the supernatural, like spells, witches, etc.. I responded that I did believe that there was tremendous knowledge that I don't have, but that I think that the concept of supernatural is a contradiction in that if it occurred then it is, by definition, not supernatural. In other words if someone figures out how to fly around on a broom stick, then broom stick flight is just something that someone else has figured out how to do...not magic, not supernatural.

    I digress because Dr. Harris has truly missed this lesson. Knowledge is a direction not a destination. And as a non-religious scientist, who respects all knowledge, I find that his certainty on so many issues makes me doubt either his credibility or his sanity.

    However, if you are looking for someone to confirm that science is the new God, then this is the book for you.

    Gare Henderson

    7 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Shawn Huckabay Blacksburg, Va 01-23-11
    Shawn Huckabay Blacksburg, Va 01-23-11 Member Since 2015
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    "Nothing New"

    Let me start with what is good about this book. It is well written and easy to follow; at no point did I find the discussion confusing or have to rewind and relisten. Sam Harris does a decent job narrating the book as well, though I do think it would be better if a professional reader had read the text instead.

    The bad, unfortunately, is the actual content of the book. First, let me answer the big question; what kind of moral philosophy is Sam Harris putting forth? It's nothing fundamentally new; it's just utilitarianism. His arguments contain all of the strengths and flaws of utilitarianism. He fails to adequately address any of the flaws. Harris also often resorts to the "Can anyone doubt...?" tactic to avoid defending or discussing key premises or assumptions in ethical thought.

    I think anyone that is moderately well read in ethical philosophy will gain little from this book. If you're looking to learn about ethics, and you're not well read on the subject, I'd recommend A History of Ethical Thought (also on Audible) over this any day.

    19 of 33 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cory Westbrook 11-21-17 Member Since 2014
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    ""moral" landscape"

    so this whole book Harris begs the question by defining morality as well being and never justifying it. he also equivacates moral good with pragmatic good without justification. what's more the whole premise of this book ie, science determining morality, is only addressed at the very beginning and then the rest is just him trying to bash religion. this book is diatribe sandwich topped with a faulty premise between 2 fallacious slices of bread

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Vericyn 11-13-17
    Vericyn 11-13-17 Member Since 2016
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    "Fantastic, but..."

    First of all, I enjoyed this book and thought that Sam made an excellent case for reason-based morality. The first few chapters where he lays out his thinking for the moral landscape and talks about the philosophical debate between Deontology and Consequentialism was extremely interesting and I would have been 100 percent satisfied if the book continued this way and he had made more of a case against Deontology, but that didn't happen. He instead decides to make a case that religious morality is flawed and superseded by reason. This is all well and good but it was the better part of the second half of the book. Instead of throwing his intellectual weight against Kant he throws it against religion yet again. I think his arguments were good and think that if he had split the second half between the railing against religion and dismantling Kant's Deontology the book would have been better off for it and I would have given it 5 stars. All so he is a great speaker and he did his book justice with his performance. AUDIBLE 20 REVIEW SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steven 11-11-17
    Steven 11-11-17 Member Since 2017
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    "life changing"

    a beautiful depiction of the most pressing issues of our time. highly recommended to anyone.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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