Your audiobook is waiting…

Plague of Shadows

The Aldoran Chronicles, Book 2
Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
Series: The Aldoran Chronicles, Book 2
Length: 22 hrs and 54 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (35 ratings)

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

As magic's influence spreads across the five kingdoms, the White Tower's reach extends with it. No place is left untouched.

In his quest for vengeance against the witch Mangora, Ty stumbles across a curious book he believes might help. But its pages hold a dark secret that threatens to unravel everything his family and friends have been fighting for. The more he reads, the more addicted he becomes to the knowledge it offers....

With no memory of who he is or where he came from, Ayrion finds himself traveling with a pair Rhivanni tinkers as they head east toward Sidara. Then a plea for help from a young rover boy leads them into the middle of a horrific bloodbath at the hands of an enemy no one has seen in over 1,000 years. If they aren't stopped, these creatures will spread across Aldor, leaving nothing but destruction in their wake....

As the first prisoner to escape the clutches of the White Tower, Ferrin's only concern is reaching his sister, Myriah, before the Black Watch catches him. Joined by Rae, her daughter, Suri, and a former captain in the Black Watch, the small band makes their way north, hoping to keep ahead of the white riders. Little do they know who has been sent to track them down....

Meanwhile, Kira and the Warren underground continue their search for Reevie as they attempt to discover the reason behind the strange disappearances in Aramoor. However, the answers they seek are more disturbing than anything they could have imagined....

©2019 Michael Wisehart (P)2019 Podium Publishing

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    26
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    28
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    23
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I strongly recommend this series.

Totally worth the wait. Looking forward to the rest of the adventure. The characters are becoming friends that I can feel pride or happiness or fear for.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Poetry in Motion

The White Tower sequel follows the first without the author feeling the need to continually rehash the story from the first book. Add to that, the narration by Tim Gerard Reynolds, and you have an audiobook that is all killer, no filler.

Bring on the 3rd instalment!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Worthy book, repetitive battle encounters tedious

Book 2 seems to focus on 3 primary, along with some secondary, character story arcs; that of Ayrion, Ty and Ferrin. Michael Wisehart ability to created interesting backstories for the good and bad secondary characters surrounding them made it easy to be entertained with each of these separate story arcs. I found Terrin's story arc the most entertaining with Ayrion's a close second. Ty's coming-of-age arc, while still entertaining, came off a bit scattered which I attribute to Wisehart decision to include so many wielders to surround him with.

The areas where my interest began to wane was the elongated, very similar battle encounters with the heroes adversaries. This was most apparent was Ayrion's battles with his nemesis.

For all of the great escapes and near-death battles the main story hadn't move forward as much as I had anticipated. Even so, I found the book very much worth the credit spent on it.

Props again to Tim Gerard Reynolds excellent narration performance.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Not long enough

Very litte ground covered in the book. Nothing was resolved. Still...Tim Gerald Reynolds. And I do find the villain and world intriguing. I just can't help but feel the book needed to be 10 to 20 hours longer

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Less epic, but better storytelling

In this second book in the series there is a definite downturn in epic scale, as it focuses more on character that big plot devices, but we have much better storytelling than the first book.

As usual, Tim Gerard Reynolds gives a solid audio performance. His voices are distinct and varied, his tempo changes are impeccable, and his vocal inflections are generally spot on. The one area his performance leaves something to be desired is his female voices (though that's a fairly common problem).

Although there are a couple of new characters here, we're largely following the continuing stories of established characters.

In that vein, there is actually quite a lot going on between our various groups. There are numerous reveals and twists throughout that are largely well-timed and cleverly put together.

There's a lot of originality here, as well as a number of elements that are strongly reminiscent of other works of fantasy. Not enough to feel derivative, more like the author is tipping his hat to his influences; which I definitely appreciate.

I enjoyed the deeper dive into some of the world's history as well as into the magic system and what it's truly capable of.

I love that even the wizard who's been around for hundreds of years doesn't know what Ty is truly capable of though.

I will admit, however, that the teen drama is wearing on me. While some parts of it are absolutely in keeping with the characters, there are other parts that seem like drama for its own sake, which definitely irritates me.

I appreciate that the POVs are tighter than the first book, especially since the one-off POV characters have been almost eliminated in this one. But here, in one or two cases, we have a chapter with two POV character labels, and the issue with the POV not changing from one chapter to the next is still present.

Now, I'm not opposed to consecutive chapters following one character in a general sense, but once a book has established itself as changing POV at chapter breaks, it's jarring to break that.

I feel that, especially with where some of the chapters end, it would have built a lot more tension had the POV shifted, forcing me to keep reading to get back to the disaster at hand.

Also, my two main prose-level complaints from the first book are still present: some of the terminology used sounds far too modern, and there's still quite a bit of passive voice and verb-tense disagreement.

However, even with these detractors the author has told quite a tale that keeps building on itself. I'm definitely starting to develop a vision of where things seem to be going and I find myself quite anxious for the next book.

And finally, the ending.
Although I think it could have been timed a bit better, with the exception of Ferrin every POV character had a major climax that was both awesome and brought their story arc to a neat close, while still being wide open for the next book.

Ferrin, however, was disappointing.
I've no doubt this was meant to be a major climax, but it felt like a letdown to me. After his big escape in book one, I was really expecting more from his part of the story in this book. He's still far and away my favorite character, I just don't feel he got his due attention in this book.


--------------


***spoiler ahead***


------------


I don't normally do spoilers in my reviews, but this one warrants it as this is, for me, at least, a pretty major issue.


----------


Definitely don't keep reading if you don't want to see the spoiler.


--------


Still with me?


------


Are you sure?


----


Alright then.


--


Without further ado.


Okay, so in this book we have 2 cases of someone making use of a body that is not their own.

In one, the possession seems to be little more that a puppeteer pulling strings (or like Sauruman's control of Theodan in LotR, if you prefer), while in the other the controller's spirit actually inhabits the body, almost like a wizard from the Dragonlance setting using the Bloodstone of Fistandantilus.

Cool, right?

Now, I understand that the circumstances are very different. But this still feels like a major hole that is desperately in need of consistency.

In one case, the inhabiting spirit still has full use of his own magic even though the body he inhabits has no talent for such.

In the other case, she uses her own knowledge but makes use of the body's inherent magical talent.

From what I can tell, the source of magic in this world seems to be the body rather than the spirit (genetics play a part, and there is the matter of the transferrals, among other factors).

Perhaps there is an explanation coming that will prove me wrong in that, or will in some other way make both of these cases make sense, but as of right now it feels like a mistake.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful