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Publisher's Summary

Sally Fallon Morell, best-selling author of Nourishing Traditions, debunks diet myths to explore what our ancestors from around the globe really ate - and what we can learn from them to be healthy, fit, and better nourished, today.

The Paleo craze has taken over the world. It asks curious dieters to look back to their ancestors' eating habits to discover a "new" way to eat that shuns grains, most dairy, and processed foods. But, while diet books with Paleo in the title sell well - are they correct? Were paleolithic and ancestral diets really grain-free, low-carb, and based on all lean meat?

In Nourishing Diets best-selling author Sally Fallon Morell explores the diets of our primitive ancestors from around the world - from Australian Aborigines and pre-industrialized Europeans to the inhabitants of "Blue Zones" where a high percentage of the populations live to 100 years or more. In looking to the recipes and foods of the past, Fallon Morell points listeners to what they should actually be eating - the key principles of traditional diets from across cultures - and offers recipes to help translate these ideas to the modern home cook.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.  

©2018 Sally Fallon Morell (P)2018 Hachette Audio

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...more precious than gold.

This thorough examination of healthy diets cuts through all the misinformation we are surrounded with and gives you a true way to reach optimum health.

7 people found this helpful

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Great Insightful Information

The discription of what different people groups eat was fascinating.
There are foods I will change in my diet because of this book.
Thank you!

4 people found this helpful

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An eye opener, and no mistake!

The author critiques current diet fads and mass-market assumptions with a well researched document of eating habits in ancient and modern cultures. Special attention is paid to places that seem to support modern hypotheses about low-fat and plant-based foods. The author essays a (successful, imho) proof of a contrary view: traditional, healthy diets require fat and animal-based foods.

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The Gift of Real Food

This book is a treasure. Sally Fallon leaves no BS stone unturned to find underneath it the nutritional gold that hides out of sight. People in our politically correct, don’t rock the boat culture fear what they don’t know and shrink away from what they don’t understand before they learn about it. In this volume, all the organ meats, fermented foods, animal fats and smelly traditional dishes that scare most of us Americans away take center stage and put real evidence about real healthy human eating patterns right up under our noses. It’s important to take any nutritional advice with a grain of salt, consider the source, and make informed decisions for your health and that of your children and loved ones; this book provides a tremendous piece of that puzzle in a deep and rich way. I loved it!

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Great information

The information contained in this book is invaluable. It’s an incredibly boring read but if you can slog through, it pretty much debunks every paleo book and guru with actual and factual information from diaries, journals, etc. from the 1700 to the 1940s of people who visited native cultures that were eating their native diets.

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Disappointed

I have been following Sally Fallon for many years. I am sorry to find this latest book to be so pedantic that I no longer take it seriously. There are several mistakes in areas of common knowledge. Much of what is said is still worthwhile but you have to endure a choppy, abrupt sentence structure and delivery where every statement is short and ended with an explanation mark. This IS the first time I've used an audio book, and there is a lot of good research here. The chapter on Australian aborigines is a wonderful survey of a complex culture.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 06-01-22

Thorough and informative

As an Australian I have never heard the agricultural/aquacultural practices and diet of the Aboriginal population pre European settlement presented in such informative detail. Such as shame we have to go to a nutrition book to learn such an important aspect of the history of our First Nations people. Also enjoyed learning about cultures from all around the world. One thing missing was the voice of Sally. Now that we live in the world of podcasts, we are intimately familiar with the voices and idiosyncrasies of our admired authors and experts. The enthusiasm of presentation just isn’t there with a professional voice artist. Please, Sally consider voicing your own books in future.

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  • Stefan Mackay
  • 05-26-21

Nothing PALEO in this book, very disappointed.

As the title states, this book is about how Paleo, Traditional and Ancestral people ate.

There are 2 reference to grind stone marks around 16,000 BC and 30,000 BC. These are the only reference to anything prior the the commencement of humans farming, approximately 10,000 years ago.
How does that make this book paleo.

Fallon misrepresents the Paleo diet with notable occasions in the book where she attacks Loren Cordain and Robb Wolf and her tone is clearly anti Paleo. Whilst Cordain did get a few things wrong, which he has since remedied, Robb Wolf was much more accurate in his dietary recommendations.

Half of the book is about historic records of Australian Aboriginals, Inuits and other traditional hunter gatherer lifestyles.
Information is from written records around 150 to 200 years ago.
Whilst this is quite fascinating, is really has nothing to do with how we would have eaten over the last 100,000 to 2,000,000 years during our formative time as a species.

The other half of the book, which I found quite tedious, was about traditional food preparation in modern populations.
Totally irrelevant to our Palaeolithic ancestors.

A major fault with the book...
The elephant in the room that no one sees...

The human species developed during glacial periods (ice ages).
With peaks of warmer weather and troughs of very cold temperatures.
We are currently in a peak at the end of a 105,000 year cycle. Interglacial, meaning between glacial periods.
Which is undoubtedly why farming practices have become so common since the last ice age retreated 15,000 years ago.

Sally states that she thinks the Australian Aborigines are probably the closest to Paleo that she can think of.

I disagree, I think the Inuit diet with it’s high percentage of meat and healthy saturated fats, almost no carbohydrates, is most likely the closest to Paleo in this book.
Remember, carbs are very difficult to find when you are living in an ice age with a world that would be very different from what most of us are living in today.

Think Northern Canada, Northern Russia, Sweden, Norway and Finland.
With NO international trucking or shipping to bring vegetables and fruits from balmy France.

Paleo whale steaks anyone ???

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  • Michael
  • 12-03-19

Enjoyed this!

Anyone interested in traditional ways of eating should read this. Let’s not let traditional methods die. :)
Good accompanying book to westons price nutrition and physical degeneration