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Publisher's Summary

From Ian Bremmer, the acclaimed Time columnist, Eurasia Group president, and expert consultant on global risk, comes a definitive guide to navigating the dangers of the age of populism.

From Brexit in the UK, to Donald Trump in the US, to extremist parties in Europe and the developing world, populism has dominated recent headlines. What explains this rise of leaders who stoke nationalist anger in their countries, from Le Pen to Erdogan? How long will the populist wave last? Who will be the winners and losers in this climate, and how can we defend the values of democracy, free trade, and international cooperation?

No one is better suited to explore these questions than Ian Bremmer, who has built his career on assessing global risk for his clients, and explaining complex political dynamics in accessible terms in publications such as Time. He explains the social, economic, and technological forces fueling this new wave of populism and why we're witnessing a rejection of the democratic, global cosmopolitan trends of the late 20th century.

Bremmer argues that, much like climate change, the rise of populism around the world is inevitable, likely to spread wider and worsen over the coming decade. But despite this bleak assessment, he also sees a light at the end of the tunnel. This audiobook offers a guide to navigating the shifting political landscape and weathering the populist storm.

©2018 Ian Bremmer (P)2018 Penguin Audio

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Good book with a big blind spot

Felt it was a very well written, concise overview of Bremmer's highly informed worldview. Excellent narration also. Very worthwhile for anyone interested in what's going on around the world in 2018 and what is likely to start happening soon. Not sure why so many struggle to grasp the insights he brings to bear. They're so straightforward when you see them!

That said, I think the exclusion of the militarism that is helping precipitate the current situation should have been addressed. Makes me significantly less enthusiastic about recommending it.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Louis
  • Deerfield Beach, Florida
  • 05-17-18

Not Very Original

This book should be common sense to anyone born within the past 40 years. It also doesn’t go into depth at all about any of the topics it covers. It’s basically an extended TV news interview.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Interesting analysis of our times, but depressing

Full of troublesome facts, like a majority of Republicans would support delaying the 2020 elections, if Trump wanted to. Like there are twice as many working age men in America not working as are working and half of them take painkillers everyday. Like the majority of young people would support a government run by the military. And these trends are worldwide. Thoroughly depressing. Makes me even more worried about my grandchildren’s future.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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So So.

The premise of the book is very interesting . But the delivery felt all over the place. Not sure if I'd recommend it.

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  • Tom
  • Warm Springs, Georgia
  • 06-20-18

Bremmer knows today’s world.

I’ve always been a follower of Ian Bremmer’s analyses of the state of the world’s governments. Here again he has painted a picture of a Populist plague gradually infecting America, The EU and Eastern Europe. No doubt it will blanket the rest of the developed world if we cannot meet its challenge. Us vs Them tries to explain and empathize with the people Globalization has left behind. His analysis is unbiased and well-reasoned and deserves a hearing.

The book is relatively short and I wish that he had spent a little more time justifying his optimism that societies divided by fear and insecurity can rise to effect the solutions he proposes. I’m not sure I share his hopefulness. But we may not have a choice if we are to survive.

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Want help understanding Trump supporters and Brexiteer friends and relatives you’ve blocked or unfollowed?

First five and last five minutes of this book speak volumes for those who feel left behind. Worth a read if you want to gain empathy for Trump supporters and Brexiteers

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good book with a valid thesis but missing solution

good book with valid thesis about what is behind the us vs them sentiment globally. It does focus mostly on US. I wish it had offered a little more in the sense of whether there is a way to restore the positive elements of globalization without creating the negative conditions that have broght it to current failure... Narrator is okay.

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Amazing analysis and clear view of a scary but fixable future

The full analysis of the 12 countries covered in this book, is profound and disturbingly real... the social phenomenon that is parallel in all casas and different approaches gives the reader a course of action on how to act and live in a fast progressive society on which we are boing set up by our own intelligence to become more disposable and a society in which the human being needs to rethink its role....

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Worth your money

Ian Bremmer shows you how greater polarization is creating rifts between societies all over the world. He focuses in particular on the developing world, and the challenges these countries are likely to face in wake of automatization in the work place. In general this is a very well-written book, and it has a good narrator. I can't say I agree with absolutely all his suggested means of rewriting the social contract (such as universal income), but I do agree with overall objective of bridging the gap between the "winners" and "losers" of globalization. If there's one thing I missed in this book, it must have been an assessment of "UsVsThem" within European states - particularly when it comes to separatism. For instance, I believe that Bremmer's main argument could be applied to explaining the most recent surge of support for Scottish and Catalonian separatism.

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very informative

An important read for those who want to understand modern times and what lies ahead