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Publisher's Summary

The fight for gay, lesbian, and trans civil rights - the years of outrageous injustice, the early battles, the heartbreaking defeats, and the victories beyond the dreams of the gay rights pioneers - is the most important civil rights issue of the present day. Based on rigorous research and more than 150 interviews, The Gay Revolution tells this unfinished story not through dry facts but through dramatic accounts of passionate struggles, with all the sweep, depth, and intricacies that only an award-winning activist, scholar, and novelist like Lillian Faderman can evoke.

The Gay Revolution begins in the 1950s, when law classified gays and lesbians as criminals, the psychiatric profession saw them as mentally ill, the churches saw them as sinners, and society victimized them with irrational hatred. Against this dark backdrop, a few brave people began to fight back, paving the way for the revolutionary changes of the 1960s and beyond. Faderman discusses the protests in the 1960s, the counter reaction of the 1970s and early '80s, the decimated but united community during the AIDS epidemic, and the current hurdles for the right to marriage equality.

©2015 Lillian Faderman (P)2015 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"[T]his volume will deservedly become a standard in the field." (Library Journal)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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An outstanding book.

What did you love best about The Gay Revolution?

The Gay Revolution gives a great history of what the gay community endured at the turn of the century and into the present day. It gives the stone cold facts but presented in a way that is compelling to listen to. There were parts in this book where I seriously got angry and then there were other parts where I wanted to cry. The LGBT community has been through so much and it is wonderful in this book that the story is told.

What did you like best about this story?

I loved the facts. I love that someone actually looked up and told the story in a way that should have been told long ago.

What does Donna Postel bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Donna Postel is awesome. I seriously could listen to her all day. When you think of someone talking about history you get this Charlie Brown sound in your head that it is going to be all boring and wha wha wha. But Donna Postel was not like that. She has a very pleasant voice to listen to and when I would listen to this story I stopped everything I was doing to listen.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

In the first few chapters when it was told about the witch hunts for homosexuals. How we were put into mental institutions with the possibility of have a lobotomy. That struck such a fear with me. I was angered yet saddened at the same time.

Any additional comments?

Thi is a must read for people. Whether you are LGBT or straight this is a book that I think everyone should read. It is a very compelling story. And I really feel that you would be moved by this book. Donna Postel is great with her reading of this and is very pleasant to listen to. I learned things that I had no clue that had taken place. Everyone should read this book.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Absolutely awe inspiring

As a recently out and married gay man, I decided that I ought to know about the stories of those who came before. So, I bought this audiobook for a listen as I walked the Appalachian Trail.

This book blew me away. Faderman does an excellent job painting the social and political struggles that the LGBT community have fought over the last seventy years, all the way from the era of gay witch hunts in government and entrapment by undercover police officers to the momentous SCOTUS decision that legalized gay marriage throughout the land.

Faderman is a masterful storyteller who has done her research thoroughly. Every landmark case relevant the struggle is discussed, as are the tactics, tensions, and setbacks of the myriad advocacy groups as they fought for equal rights. I found this book to be so gripping as to have me hooked on every word for hours at a time.

The narrator, I think, did a fine job objecting emotion and character into her reading. I would listen to another of her narrations with no reserve.

As social histories go, this book is my go to. I intend to listen to it time and time again - we stand on the shoulders of giants.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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An Important History For All

This history of the LGBTQ+ rights movement in America is compelling, honest, and deeply enlightening. While failing to adequately address bisexual and trans aspects of the story, it is a vital resource for everyone wanting to know the history. Well performed. Audible 20 Review Sweepstakes Entry

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AMAZING!!! Worth your time! Required!

I loved this! It is long and dense and detailed! So informative! Required reading for LGBT community and allies to be more informed of our legacy and our early pioneers that lead the struggle so we can have the life we do!

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Should be required reading in school

I am reading the last chapter just in time for the yearly gay festivities of June 2017, and if this coincidence isn’t queer drama of operatic magnitude, I don’t know what is. I lift my eye gaze from the book and see the ocean of rainbow flags covering West Hollywood and Tel Aviv, and I feel that I just woke up from a nightmare in which I wasn’t considered a citizen worthy of rights. In that nightmare queers were arrested by police in their own bedrooms; fired from their civil and military jobs despite spotless performances; denied the right to make a living; lost their children, and kicked out of supposedly loving families simply for being who they were. I carry in my bones my own remembered fear of my coming out to my conservative father, who had only accepted me on his death bed. Thank you, Lillian Faderman for your brilliant historical research and for telling the heroic stories of those whose struggle made it possible for us to raise the rainbow flags in pride. I’m also afraid for us, because I see what’s at stake today. A few strokes of an executive order could make us lose all that was achieved in the last fifty years. “The Gay Revolution” should be required reading in all public schools.

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Everyone Should Give This One A Listen

An intriguing, comprehensive, and engaging history of gay the struggle and gay rights in the United States!

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THANK YOU<br />

Wow, I cannot thank you enough for sharing with me a culture that I have been afraid to approach. I left the Christian Right because the attitude shared in this book. You introduced me to heroes.

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Horrible narration, author shows dramatic bias

What would have made The Gay Revolution better?

The narrator is horrible, sounds like Siri on an iPhone! She mispronounces names and locations throughout. Will Truman was the character on Will and Grace, not Will Thurman...the Valley in San Francisco is pronounced No'ee, not No. The author focuses on Frank Kameny almost exclusively, though incredibly important he is not the revolution in totality. I found myself board at times when the author gives too much detail...the story is lost in detail at several points in the book. It could have been so much better.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

Better narration and less bias in the story.

What didn’t you like about Donna Postel’s performance?

The narrator is horrible, sounds like Siri on an iPhone! She mispronounces names and locations throughout. Will Truman was the character on Will and Grace, not Will Thurman...the Valley in San Francisco is pronounced No'ee, not No.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

The story itself, although lost in detail at many points in the book, its an empowering story.

Any additional comments?

Don't ever let Donna Postel narrate another book, PLEASE...I know I will never buy another book she narrates, just horrible!

1 of 3 people found this review helpful