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Publisher's Summary

This essay by Thoreau first published in 1849, argues that individuals should not permit governments to overrule their consciences. It goes on to say that individuals have a duty to avoid allowing the government to make them the agents of injustice. The quote: "That government is best which governs least," sometimes attributed to Thomas Jefferson or Thomas Paine, actually was first found in this essay. Thoreaus' thoughts were motivated by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican-American War but they are still relevant and resonate today.

Public Domain (P)2011 Jimcin Recordings

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Terrible, terrible, terrible, terrible Narration,

Unbelievably bad sing song voice characterisation. Reprehensible that Audble would sell such a poor rendition of such a great classic work.

Tragic, tragically bad.

Warning stay away!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

10:22 p.m., 10th of January, 2018

Timely and timeless. As Henry David explained, as Mahatima Ghandi adopted and proved out, as Reverend King brought it home: all who persist, will prevail! As we must do now too against considerable odds against our complacent, overindulged consumptive stupor and act too restore our democracy for ourselves and for our children - or not at all, forever.

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It's good

Discussing slavery and American involvement in war with Mexico, this is one man's thoughts on how the individual relates to his/her government. It's good. It's easy to see how these arguments in this unpinned Martin Luther King's efforts and the civil rights movement. Unfortunately, the reader/narrator is very lifeless - eradicating from the work the passion with which Thoreau surely wrote it.

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Not Sure

Any additional comments?

I wanted to listen to this because I have recently read the most dangerous man in America about David Ellsberg and the Pentagon papers; however I found the book slightly boring little bit on the whining side about politics and government and the way the people are. So I really didn't see that it really added much to my understanding however the underlying theme here is; to say something if you think you're right an you know something is wrong get it out in the open and that's what David Elsberg did and as a Vietnam Veteran I'm glad he did.

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monotone

this was read as tho it was required speaking to a class room full of scollors that already knew the text. No inflection or passion expressed. The words were inspiring but the speaker bored me to distraction.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Can the thoughts of 1849 be applied in the 21st-century?

Henry David Thoreau gave us a lot to think about how we ought to organize our lives. You can listen to this audible book in about an hour. It is one of the most quoted essays by the war tax resistance movement.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful