Regular price: $44.09

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
  • Get access to the Member Daily Deal
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

In 1845 Henry David Thoreau, one of the principal New England Transcendentalists, left the small town of Concord for the country. Beside the lake of Walden he built himself a log cabin and returned to nature, to observe and reflect – while surviving on eight dollars a year.

From this experience emerged Walden, one of the great classics of American literature, and a deeply personal reaction against the commercialism and materialism that Thoreau saw as the main impulses of mid-19th-century America. Here also is Civil Disobedience, Thoreau’s essay on just resistance to government, which not only challenged the establishment of his day but has been used as a flag for later campaigners from Mahatma Ghandi to Dr Martin Luther King.

©2010 Naxos Audiobook (P)2010 Naxos Audiobook

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    311
  • 4 Stars
    132
  • 3 Stars
    74
  • 2 Stars
    30
  • 1 Stars
    17

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    267
  • 4 Stars
    121
  • 3 Stars
    49
  • 2 Stars
    21
  • 1 Stars
    13

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    276
  • 4 Stars
    87
  • 3 Stars
    69
  • 2 Stars
    19
  • 1 Stars
    16
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Brilliant

Thoreau wrote with passion and sometimes anger. The performance reflects Thoreau's bitterness with the government and people of Concord and the United States. Thoreau looks deep into himself and society. The writing is amazing and Degas played to the character almost as if he was an old friend of Thoreau.

12 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

One-note

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The reader conveyed a persistent tone of anger, resentment and scorn. Never just thoughtful. I kept wondering what voice I would have heard reading the actual book and how reading it myself would have changed my experience of the book.

24 of 27 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Kudoes for Rupert Degas

Henry David could not read Walden's timeless words any better than Degas. I've listened to it many times, and I hear new wisdom with each listen. I first read Walden 50 years ago, and Thoreau's message is just as timey today as it was then. Degas does justice to this everlasting classic. Thoreau by Degas is a treasure for all nature lovers.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

amazing book, ok narration

The book is amazing but most of the literate world already knows this. The reading is ok. At first sounding poetic but as the tone of each sentence goes through the same cyle of inflection, it starts to become repetitious and boring. The narrator begins each sentence strong and clear and slowly meanders to a quiet finish, almost whispering the last words. This would be fine ocaasionally but as it continues to recur you get exhausted listening to him. By no way should this trump the importance of this book in every collection and if your prefered method of digestion is auditory, I maintain a high recommendation for the purchase of this work.

16 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Didn't care for the narration

This is a great book, but I couldn't get into listening to it. I found myself drifting off to sleep or day dreaming. I think this was partly because the narrator's voice is rather depressing to listen to--flat, sad and dejected--although this very well may be the tone of the writer's voice and not the narrator's fault.

7 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Thought provoking

Amazing book! I occasionally struggled with the narration but the content made that easy for me to keep listening.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

This should be read by everyone!

What made the experience of listening to Thoreau: Walden / Civil Disobedience (Unabridged) the most enjoyable?

This book will help you stop and reevaluate things. Too caught up in the struggles of modern life? Thoreau's Walden is a must read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

great storyteller. Must read classic.

Where does Thoreau: Walden / Civil Disobedience (Unabridged) rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

with the best

Who was your favorite character and why?

Henry,the main character with deep thoughts about life. Very useful knowledge of living.

What does Rupert Degas bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

an attitude of awe.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

no

Any additional comments?

MUST READ/LISTEN TO THIS BOOK

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Good book, good narration

Thoreau is a great writer, thinker, and philosopher. I really enjoyed Walden.

I like the performance by Rupert Degas.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

A Great Listen and a Classic

Surprisingly relevant to our times, this book provides a guide for thinking. It can be enjoyed for it's place in time, but it's poetry-prose at its best. Some have found it condescending, but it's beautiful, edgy, and has lasting wisdom. I even enjoyed a bit of the bean counting economics, but more prominent is the celebration of individualism against a lost society. There are lessons here for now, expressed with a mix of wit, charm, and gall. The audio performance is excellent. #tagsgiving #sweepstakes

Sort by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Paul Parkins
  • 01-18-17

Skip Walden, go straight to Civil Disobedience

I had no problem with the recording or performance. It could just be me, but I found little of value in Walden - wasn't what I was expecting, and found myself skipping lots. This would be a worse review if it weren't for Civil Disobedience, which I'd read before, so I already knew that was good - that's 4 or 5 star content, but can probably get it elsewhere.

2 of 9 people found this review helpful

Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 11-23-16

Great Literature

This is one of the most important works of American literature. it is a book I return to again and again. This reading is very good. Degas rises almost to the height of the literature itself. Do yourself a favour. Buy this audio book. Listen to it. Absorb it. Thoreau is so poorly understood and, like the Bible, people rip bits out that suit their particular agenda. But when you read these texts in their entirety, and you should, you get the full flavour of Thoreau's wit, charm and eminent sense of justice. It has been said that there have only ever been two real Christians, Christ himself and St Francis of Assisi. And of the two, Jesus doesn't quite cut the mustard. But Thoreau comes close to being the third. Not that this is a Bible bashing exercise in Christian hegemony. It is anything but that. But Thoreau's sense of humanity may well be the acme of the humanist philosophical endeavour. He was a great thinker. A revolutionary. A philosopher. A lofty American. Every great American speech written in the last 150 years has its elbows resting on the literary platter penned by Thoreau.