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Publisher's Summary

In the tradition of our most acclaimed suspense writers, the author of The Last Town on Earth delivers a riveting and elegant police procedural set in Atlanta, a ripped-from-the-headlines depiction of a world on the cusp of great change involving race relations, city politics, and police corruption.

Responding to pressure from on high, the Atlanta Police Department is forced to hire its first black officers. It's a victory of sorts, though the newly minted policemen are met with deep hostility by their white peers, and their authority is limited: They can't arrest a suspect unless a white officer is present; they can't drive squad cars; they can't even enter the station through the front door.

When a black woman who was last seen in a car driven by a white man with connections to the APD turns up fatally beaten, no one seems to care except for Lucius and Boggs, two black cops from vastly different backgrounds, who risk their jobs, the trust the community has put in them, and even their own safety to investigate her death. When their efforts stall, they have to work alongside fellow officers who include the old-school cop Dunlow and his partner, Rakestraw, a young progressive who may or may not be willing to make allies across color lines.

Set in the postwar, pre-civil rights South, and evoking the socially resonant and morally complex crime novels of Dennis Lehane, George Pelecanos, and Walter Mosley, Darktown is a vivid, smart, intricately plotted crime saga that explores the issues of race, law enforcement, and the uneven scales of justice.

©2016 Thomas Mullen (P)2016 Simon & Schuster

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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EXCELLENT Historical Police Procedural

I purchased this book on sale and am so glad I did! I had recently found it and put it in my wishlist. This book was certainly worth the sale price but would have been worth the credit.
I won't do a recap of the book because I think there are enough reviews and the synopsis for that. After listening to this book I was inspired to compare facts vs fiction and did some reading of articles I found from that era. I won't say that I was surprised at the accuracy. I think if anything more saddened for what these 8 black officers (there really were eight experimental officers) went through. And with the KKK alive and well and active within the police department and the Jim Crowe laws enforcing segregation these men went out in uniforms of the police but they may as well have had toy guns with all the restrictions placed on them.
I thought this was an excellent historical police procedural and HIGHLY RECOMMEND this book. There is a second book in this series (Lightening Men) which I will definitely be listening to next.
Narration by Andre Holland was excellent.
If you found this review helpful please indicate so.
Thank You.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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1948 Atlanta Police Department

This is a book I highly recommend -- with reservations. It is not an easy listen. This is 1948 Atlanta Police Department where there is an "experiment" to utilize 8 black policemen that can only work in certain areas of Atlanta known as Darktown. The black policemen cannot have patrol cars, cannot arrest white people and must call out white officers whenever suspects are rounded up. As bad as that is, it gets worse with the extreme racism woven throughout the story. Jim Crowe is in full effect and civil rights are in the earliest stage. I don't doubt any of the specifics, and it is so painful and infuriating to know this is our history. What kept me going was the strong plot and writing of Thomas Mullen. The narrator, Andre Holland, was the perfect voice for this story. Holland brought a calming voice when extreme violence and situation were proceeding.

"Darktown" is a clever story that provides powerful history and a good mystery and police procedural. This is a book I would love to see as a movie.

11 of 13 people found this review helpful

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A terrific book. What is fiction, and what is fact

Would you consider the audio edition of Darktown to be better than the print version?

I haven't read the print version, but as with all books that have great narrators, I feel that the loss of the performance would diminish my enjoyment of the book. Mr. Mullen has written a great story about the struggles of black people in the South (although the struggle continues to exist, all over the country). The vestiges of slavery are everywhere. The blurb notes that the new black officers were very clearly second class citizens. The degree of this treatment is so obvious and so cold that the few men willing to take on these stigmas can be seen as heroes. However, in fact they must make horrible compromises just in order to keep their jobs, and be grudgingly accepted by the mostly seriously bigoted older white cops. It's not just that they cannot arrest anyone without a white officer present, or that their "office" is in the concrete block basement room of the local YMCA. It is also a fact that they are often endangered by the white cops more than any other faction of the society which they serve and protect.

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

Absolutely yes. The plot is driven by several events and social tendencies: first is the murder of a lovely, light-skinned black woman who seems like she doesn't at all belong in the whorehouse where she briefly lives. Other plot aspects also push the story forward, as do the many murders (there may be too much gore for some readers) and also the desires of many Atlanta residents to make sure that they stay cleanly on the "right" side of the class/color divide. There are a few clear heroes, and we root strongly for them to survive. There are numerous anti-heroes, who might as well be wearing the flag of the south and mouthing "The South will rise again." This slogan was still very much alive when I went to Vanderbilt in 1966-68. MLK and Robert Kennedy were assassinated in 1968, and, as I have remarked before, there were Army tanks rolling down West End Avenue, which bordered the Vanderbilt campus, in the days after those crimes. A number of my dorm-mates had the rebel flag hanging on their walls. Much of this book is frighteningly real.

What does Andre Holland bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Andre Holland has mastered the nuance of individual Southern accents as well as the variety of human emotional speech. I trusted his voice immediately, and never did question that trust. In particular, the "Southern hospitality" which is often just a thin veneer of hostility and condescension: this is a tough variety of speech to capture, and he does it beautifully. He is fully up to the complex task of communicating the mix of human feelings in the stories here. I will definitely look for other books that he has narrated.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

There are a number of these, and it would be hard to single out any one of them.

Any additional comments?

As above, there may well be readers who are not up for the violence. However, if you can look past that, this is a wonderfully written and narrated book. Those who are interested in the struggle of the black man, woman and child in this country will find themselves with a new understanding of how deep this conflict goes. My hat is off to Mr. Mullen and Mr. Holland: they have taught me many valuable lessons on a topic with which I had felt myself to be reasonably educated. Bravo.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

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Gripping and compelling storytelling.

Thomas Mullen has written a masterwork based in the 1940s which rings all too true today. I hope there's more to come about Boggs and Smith's careers in the Police force. Beautifully narrated!

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

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An amazingly well crafted and well performed novel

Truly top caliber tightly woven story, with strong and believable characters, as well as a glimpse back to a bit of our shameful racist past. I was sad to reach the end of the book, this is one you can't put down but when u do force yourself to do so, you look forward to picking it up again as soon as possible; you become friends with the main characters and it is easy to see the world through their eyes.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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great setting with a predictable story

the setting is really well rendered, and it's very clear that the writer has done his research. But the plot is flabby and the stitching of elements is visible a lot of the time. His attempts to bring depth to the characters are Valiant, but he readily falls into the realm of cliche most of the time. Andre Holland is a great reader and brings a lot of this to life

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • K
  • 08-19-17

Perfect

unique story and time -- narration was spot on. I would definitely recommend you take a listen

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Story ok

I was expecting more of a twist. Good insight into early Atlanta. Narrator was superb

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Amanda
  • Jacksonville Florida
  • 05-03-17

Best Narration Ever

This story was very engaging. The narrator did an excellent job of making distinguishing between characters.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Superb listen

This was an excellent book to have an audio. The subtle nuance of tone and emotion enhanced the experience. The mystery is good, with the racial background, made at times unbearable to read, because of the unbelievable cruelty and hatred of southern racists, and the fact that the law was on their side. It's impossible to know how horrible it was to live through it.
It's just as timely today, unfortunately.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Gage
  • 10-18-16

amazing story

Amazing story, very well told with enough suspense to keep you at the edge. the narrator was a perfect fit for this story.

overall my first experience with audible has been fantastic.