We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
 >   > 
The Tree Audiobook

The Tree: A Natural History of What Trees Are, How They Live, and Why They Matter

Regular Price:$35.00
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

There are redwoods in California that were ancient by the time Columbus first landed and pines still alive that germinated around the time humans invented writing. There are Douglas firs as tall as skyscrapers and a banyan tree in Calcutta as big as a football field.

From the tallest to the smallest, trees inspire wonder in all of us, and in The Tree, Colin Tudge travels around the world - throughout the United States, the Costa Rican rain forest, Panama and Brazil, India, New Zealand, China, and most of Europe - bringing to life stories and facts about the trees around us: how they grow old, how they eat and reproduce, how they talk to one another (and they do), and why they came to exist in the first place. He considers the pitfalls of being tall; the things that trees produce, from nuts and rubber to wood; and even the complicated debt that we as humans owe them.

Tudge takes us to the Amazon in flood, when the water is deep enough to submerge the forest entirely and fish feed on fruit while river dolphins race through the canopy. He explains the "memory" of trees: how those that have been shaken by wind grow thicker and sturdier while those attacked by pests grow smaller leaves the following year; and reveals how it is that the same trees found in the United States are also native to China (but not Europe).

From tiny saplings to centuries-old redwoods and desert palms, from the backyards of the American heartland to the rain forests of the Amazon and the bamboo forests, Colin Tudge takes the listener on a journey through history and illuminates our ever-present but often ignored companions. A blend of history, science, philosophy, and environmentalism, The Tree is an engaging and elegant look at the life of trees and what modern research tells us about their future.

©2006 Colin Tudge (P)2016 Random House Audio

What the Critics Say

"Enchanting.... Tudge sees grandeur in how trees exist in the world...and demonstrates it with fascinating stories." (New York Times Book Review)

"Tudge writes in the great tradition of naturalists such as Humboldt and John Muir.... Eloquent and deeply persuasive." (Los Angeles Times)

"To be both scientifically literate and lyrically inclined is a unique gift, and justly celebrated whenever we encounter it, in Lewis Thomas, for example, or in Stephen Jay Gould. Colin Tudge is such an individual." (Melissa Fay Green, Washington Post)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (35 )
5 star
 (21)
4 star
 (6)
3 star
 (5)
2 star
 (3)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
4.1 (31 )
5 star
 (16)
4 star
 (7)
3 star
 (4)
2 star
 (4)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.1 (33 )
5 star
 (18)
4 star
 (5)
3 star
 (8)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (2)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    E. Miller 04-28-17
    E. Miller 04-28-17
    HELPFUL VOTES
    68
    RATINGS
    REVIEWS
    462
    4
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not the book described in the Audible summary"
    How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

    Based on the publisher's summary, and a fascinating opening chapter, I was disappointed that much of the book is a tedious taxonomy. Much attention is paid to Latin names and cataloging; the really interesting facts about trees are buried in all of that.


    What aspect of Enn Reitel’s performance would you have changed?

    The narrator has a style that's somehow sing-song and monotonous at the same time.


    Was The Tree worth the listening time?

    I only made it halfway through the book before returning it. I'm sure readers who are interested in the minutiae of class, order, family, etc. will enjoy it.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Pb 04-08-17
    Pb 04-08-17
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    RATINGS
    REVIEWS
    4
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Informative and great listening"

    Nice review of many tree species. Great review of taxonomy. Would recommend to any one interested in botany and natural history of tress.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dubito Ergo Sum Vancouver BC 04-03-17
    Dubito Ergo Sum Vancouver BC 04-03-17 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    104
    RATINGS
    REVIEWS
    28
    20
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    5
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Arboricultural Wonder"
    If you could sum up The Tree in three words, what would they be?

    Run Forest Run! (hehehehe)... I'm So Poplar! (ok I'll stop).... Hows Tree's Evolve


    What did you like best about this story?

    How Tudge recapped the recent changes being made to the science of plant taxonomy. I'm a certified arborist, so I study modern plant biology, however I never had to unlearn old names from outdated naming systems, and to learn why I now refer to leguminous trees as Fabaceae was really cool. The science of cladistics, classing plants according to their true evolutionary history, which in the plant world can get pretty messy.

    I also routinely run into clients and customers that don't understand evolution, or have even been sold the "theory not a fact" meme. Explaining the evolution of new plant species has allowed me to educate people about evolution in a way that doesn't seem to threaten them the way a primatologist would explain it (I'm looking at you Frans de Waal). Tudges excellent writing on trees has given me a full armory of stories to deploy, and will keep me returning to the book for years.


    What aspect of Enn Reitel’s performance would you have changed?

    The pronunciation of many scientific names and terms could have been better, a novice would be well advised to not use this book as a pronunciation reference.


    Any additional comments?

    The book uses modern scientific naming when referring to tree species, so people unfamiliar with "latin" naming may find the latin in this book to be excessive but gardeners, nurserymen and students of biology will love it. Best explanation of polyploid mutations I've yet found.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Todd Sankey 09-26-16
    Todd Sankey 09-26-16
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    RATINGS
    REVIEWS
    16
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Long and it felt like it"

    this book had awkward reading with unnatural cadence made this hard to listen to. That aside, there is a lot of terminology. for me it dominated the book.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.