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Publisher's Summary

Carson's full-scale treatment of American history combines scholarly exactness with evocative passages that lead the listener to a clearer understanding of the people and events, the triumphs and the shortcomings, that have shaped this nation. This volume commences with the Great Depression and takes us to the mid-1980s.

As the author of Basic Economics, Carson is well-suited to diagnose the causes of the stock market crash and the years of economic depression that followed. Further discussions include the New Deal, the National Labor Relations Act, the start of Social Security, World War II, the Cold War, Welfare in the U.S. and abroad, black activism, the Cultural Revolution, Vietnam, the rise of the Conservative movement, Nixon and Watergate, the Carter presidency, and the beginning of the Reagan years.

Don't miss the rest of the titles in the A Basic History of the United States series:
  • Volume 1
  • Volume 2
  • Volume 4
  • Volume 6
  • ©1986 Clarence B. Carson; (P)1993 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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    A Conservative Condemnation

    The author gives a credible account of the facts and dates of American History but can scarcely contain his conservative bias, skipping over incidents that put conservative players in bad odor while delivering lengthy caustic screeds about "socialism" and the "welfare state."

    Everyone has bias, but historians have an obligation to do their best to present as objective a picture as is humanly possible. If one is going to make political judgments, then clearly set them off as opinion and provide outlooks from both sides.