Folk Music in the United States

An Introduction
Narrated by: Steven A. Berner
Length: 4 hrs and 13 mins
4 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Folk Music in the United States gives listeners a broad overview of many kinds of folk music found in this country, from the songs of rural Appalachia and New England through the indigenous music of the American Indians and the African music brought by slaves, to the folk songs of European minorities. It traces the way folk music lives in the modern city, in the academic world, and in the contemporary music of American composers.

The audiobook introduces listeners to the study of folk music as a kind of music and as an aspect of human culture. It uses music as an index to understanding American culture while it introduces listeners to various concepts in the field of ethnomusicology.

The book is published by Wayne State University Press.

©1976 Wayne State University Press (P)2013 Redwood Audiobooks

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Mechanical narration almost ruins the content

Would you consider the audio edition of Folk Music in the United States to be better than the print version?

I haven't read the print version, but I think I would have rather read it.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

The story itself was interesting.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The narration sounded very artificial, uncannily like text-to-speech synthesis. Very distracting.

1 person found this helpful