Regular price: $29.99

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

The Poisonwood Bible is a story told by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, a fierce evangelical Baptist who takes his family and mission to the Belgian Congo in 1959. They carry with them all they believe they will need from home, but soon find that all of it - from garden seeds to Scripture - is calamitously transformed on African soil.

This tale of one family's tragic undoing and remarkable reconstruction, over the course of three decades in postcolonial Africa, is set against history's most dramatic political parables.

The Poisonwood Bible dances between the darkly comic human failings and inspiring poetic justices of our times. In a compelling exploration of religion, conscience, imperialist arrogance, and the many paths to redemption, Barbara Kingsolver has brought forth her most ambitious work ever.

©2004 Barbara Kingsolver; (P)2004 Brilliance Audio

Critic Reviews

"Haunting..A novel of character, a narrative shaped by keen-eyed women." (New York Times Book Review)
"The book's sheer enjoyability is given depth by Kingsolver's insight and compassion for Congo, including its people, and their language and sayings." (Boston Globe)
"Beautifully written....Kingsolver's tale of domestic tragedy is more than just a well-told yarn.. Played out against the bloody backdrop of political struggles in Congo that continue to this day, it is also particularly timely." (People)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    3,993
  • 4 Stars
    1,655
  • 3 Stars
    565
  • 2 Stars
    166
  • 1 Stars
    127

Performance

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    3,125
  • 4 Stars
    1,149
  • 3 Stars
    442
  • 2 Stars
    143
  • 1 Stars
    125

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    3,321
  • 4 Stars
    1,105
  • 3 Stars
    397
  • 2 Stars
    116
  • 1 Stars
    85
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

one of my favorite

What did you like about this audiobook?

The narrator is excellent. I'm going to look up other books she's narrated

How has the book increased your interest in the subject matter?

This is one of my favorite books of all time. I read it over a decade ago and revisiting it on audio was a pleasure. The characters are complex, I love learning a bit of history and subject matter gets you thinking. Love it.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

I now feel I understand the Congo

An rich book, beautifully detailed and full of wisdom and compassion. Begins slowly but draws you in as you move forward.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

interesting

interesting,Americans are always bad guys but everyone always comes begging narrator was fine would not mind listening to more read by this person

  • Overall

Interesting Story

I enjoyed listening to the narrator and found the story intriguing. Highly recommend to read and captivating. Would read or listen to more books from the author.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Well written, documented, and mind opening

Highly recommend to anyone who has an interest in non-American cultures. A must read. I enjoyed the audio performance.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Alexis
  • SAN FRANCISCO, CA, United States
  • 01-16-15

Great Book Told From Multi-Person Perspective

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, even though it is different from what I normally read. It raises complex, theoretical and real-world questions of politics, colonialism, racism, culture and religion through the perspectives of a southern, early 1960s housewife and her three daughters. Each chapter is told from the perspective of each woman as she attempts to cope with moving from the deep south in the United States to Kilanga in the Belgian Congo with their missionary husband/father. Each integrates with the Congo land and people in their own ways, while each dealing with the heavy-handed presence of their father/husband. The book is beautifully narrated and is one of the few that causes you to contemplate the underlying characters and environment, even when you're not reading. The events in the book and the ending will leave you both joyful and mourning - it is not a book to be missed.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Very good book!

What made the experience of listening to The Poisonwood Bible the most enjoyable?

Honestly, I thought the narrator did a great job. I especially enjoyed her narration of Rachel. There were times in the beginning where I wasn't sure which girl was talking but after a few hours into the book I got the subtle differences in how they were voiced.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Poisonwood Bible?

Ruth May and the snake, the driver ants and Rachel's engagement.

What does Dean Robertson bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

I thought her accent really reminded one of how far Georgia really is from the Congo in a way reading it wouldn't capture.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I thought it was a powerful book. Especially the relationship between Ada and her mother and the choice her mother made at one point in the book.

Any additional comments?

Definitely a worthwhile read. I didn't think I would like it but I ended up really enjoying it.<br/>

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Jes
  • Hobart, IN, United States
  • 01-02-15

Why don’t people listen?

Here we have a man who takes his children to a country he knows nothing about with the intent on ‘teaching the dumb savages’ how to live a better way which fails miserably! I’ve been in this trap in my life where I thought the same thing, but it was people of my own country. I learned hard the first few times and after that I got wise real quick to listen to the ‘dumb savages’ which saved me. I’ve learned more listening than deciding I know what’s best. Here this guy never learns even after the death of his own child right before his eyes! He can’t feed them, protect them or even get them out!

It’s a great story told by each of the 5 girls and gives a fresh perspective on with each one’s point of view being different from the others. How did they get out? Read and find out if the guy who brought them there ever learned his lessons.

  • Overall

an interesting read

took me a while to get into, but once I did I really enjoyed it I like how Kingsolver writes from inside her characters

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Congo as seen by missionaries.

Would you consider the audio edition of The Poisonwood Bible to be better than the print version?

did not read the print version

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Poisonwood Bible?

When the girls had to leave there home in the Congo.

Which character – as performed by Dean Robertson – was your favorite?

All female characters were outstanding as well as father.

Who was the most memorable character of The Poisonwood Bible and why?

The mother because of her quiet tolerance.

Any additional comments?

You may agree or disagree with their live decisions but this book offers so much insight and narration is outstanding.