Regular price: $25.59

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of The Master by Colm Toibin, read by Geoffrey Howard.

In January 1895 Henry James anticipates the opening of his first play, Guy Domville, in London. The production fails, and he returns, chastened and humiliated, to his writing desk. The result is a string of masterpieces, but they are produced at a high personal cost.

In The Master Colm Toibin captures the exquisite anguish of a man who circulated in the grand parlours and palazzos of Europe, who was astonishingly vibrant and alive in his art, and yet whose attempts at intimacy inevitably failed him and those he tried to love. It is a powerful account of the hazards of putting the life of the mind before affairs of the heart.

©2014 Penguin Books Limited (P)2014 Colm Tóibín

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.8 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Jennykching
  • 08-08-17

A wonderful book

What did you like most about The Master?

Com Toibin paints a very sympathetic and intelligent portrait of Henry James, which includes some of his rather major shortcomings. Despite these, one can't help feeling love for the man--and empathy for the emotional pain he often suffered. Toibin portrays his idiosyncratic personality and conveys his loneliness (which he no doubt rarely admitted to suffering, even to himself) very finely. This was coupled with his determination to maintain his freedom in order to devote himself to his art. I must say the book is infinitely more readable than some of James' works! The narrator was excellent-- his reading was perfectly pitched.. The book recreates the era beautifully also.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

The material covering his relationship with Constance Fennimore Woodson was very finely wrought.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

That concerning his friendship with Constance Finnimore Woolson. Beautifully and sensitively crafted. I was almost in tears (and I'm not a crier). It stayed with me for many days.

Any additional comments?

Hats off to Colm Toibin and the narrator--this is a beautiful book.