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Publisher's Summary

When Andrew Bridge was seven years old, he and his mother - a mentally unstable woman who loved her child more than she could care for him - slid deeper and deeper into poverty, until they were reduced to scavenging for food in trash bins. Welfare officials did little more than threaten to take Andrew away, until a social worker arrived with a police escort and did just that while his mother screamed on the sidewalk. And so began Andrew's descent into the foster care system - "care" being a terrible irony, as he received almost none for the next 11 years.

Academic achievement was Andrew's ticket out of hell - a scholarship to Wesleyan University led to Harvard Law School and a Fulbright Scholarship. Now an accomplished adult, he has dedicated his life to working on behalf of the frightened children still lost in the system. Hope's Boy is his story, a story of endurance and the power of love and, most of all, of hope.

©2008 Andrew Bridge; (P)2008 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"An inspiring account." (Library Journal)
"Bridge...has provided remarkable insights into a dark corner of American society." (Publishers Weekly)

What members say

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  • Story
  • Anthony
  • Jersey City, NJ, United States
  • 01-12-12

American spilling his guts

Would you listen to Hope's Boy again? Why?

No. Too painful

What was one of the most memorable moments of Hope's Boy?

The Lamberts' incredible stone-like cruelty. Jason.

What does David Drummond bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

What?

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I must admit that after the first 45 minutes I was really taken in by the story.

Any additional comments?

Amazing that anyone who really experienced this kind of childhood would really be able to recount it in such detail. This is what I find so disturbing about Americans. How can this author describe all this in such detail and walk down the street the next day? Leads me to conclude that he is profiting off of his admittedly bad childhood in foster care. Difficult to believe the Lamberts were really that cold, calculating and cruel. Why didn't the grandmother in Chicago make a greater effort to claim him when the time came? Also, it seems that after becoming a big time successful lawyer,

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Moving example of strength.

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Mental illness is not an easy disease to live with on any level.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Hope's Boy?

The boy he went to visit in the first chapter.

Which character – as performed by David Drummond – was your favorite?

The grandmother.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The separation scene during her street episode

Any additional comments?

Admirable.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Needs focus and passion

Is this book a plea for help for the homeless? the mentally ill? kids lanquishing in the foster care system? Yes, the author didn't have a pleasant upbringing. It didn't really stir anything one way or another, due to no real plea for anything as this book could have (and should have) been. Bottom line: missed opportunity with a mediocre offering.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Into the Mind of the Childcare System

Andrew Bridge delivers a heartfelt and personal narrative about his time as a slave to the foster care/childcare system.

As a young boy, Andy Bridge wasn't expected to go anywhere, amount to anything. Through a series of heart-wrenching and tear-welling moments, this novella sheds some light on the struggles of children confined to the foster care system as victims of child abuse, neglect and/or maltreatment.

Narrated excellently, written even better. Bridge is an excellent author who will humbly put things into perspective then break your heart in the same page. For those curious about the quality of life children from broken or mistreating homes experience, this book can give a shocking, but harsh and realistic, frame of reference.

I not only applaud Bridge for his writing, but his undeniable perseverance and his work with at-risk children. The man is a gentleman, scholar, but most importantly, one whose story should not be forgotten.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Sad

I found this book to be a sad indictment of the foster care and mental health care system of the time period it was written. As a CASA, Court Appointed Special Advocate, I can see that, at least in my state things have improved but not to the point where they need to be. The foster care system is filled with harried workers whose load is far to high. We have a court system that must follow the letter of the law and not the spirit. At least at this point and time older children are now more involved in their cases. They have more of a voice, at least in New Mexico.

I would encourage all CASA volunteers to read and consider this story carefully.

  • Overall

Great Audiobook!

This was a great audiobook. I wish Audible would have more like it.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Cathryn
  • Allegan, MI, United States
  • 01-31-10

What a Story!

This is a sad and true story. It is fantastic that Andrew Bridge learned to live beyond his painful childhood and become an advocate for kids in foster care. The book is well worth the listen (or read)! Inspiring tale!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful