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Publisher's Summary

Alexandra Fuller tells the idiosyncratic story of her life growing up white in rural Rhodesia as it was becoming Zimbabwe. The daughter of hardworking, yet strikingly unconventional English-bred immigrants, Alexandra arrives in Africa at the tender age of two. She moves through life with a hardy resilience, even as a bloody war approaches. Narrator Lisette Lecat reads this remarkable memoir of a family clinging to a harsh landscape and the dying tenets of colonialism.
©2001 Alexandra Fuller; (P)2003 Recorded Books, LLC

Critic Reviews

  • Book Sense Book of the Year Award Winner, Adult Non-Fiction, 2003

"A classic is born in this tender, intensely moving and even delightful journey through a white African girl's childhood." (Publishers Weekly)
"This was no ordinary childhood, and it makes a riveting story thanks to an extraordinary telling." (School Library Journal)
"In this powerful debut, Fuller fully succeeds in memorializing the beauty of each desert puddle and each African summer night sky while also recognizing that beauty can lie hidden in the faces of those who have crossed her path. Highly recommended." (Library Journal)
"An honest, moving portrait of one family struggling to survive tumultuous times." (Booklist)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
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    27
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Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
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    109
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    37
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    5
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Story

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Glad I finally read this book!

I bought the audible version a few days ago. I listened for two days and could not stop until the end. The book and the story are riveting and well written. The reader is amazing, one of the best I have heard.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Very good

Where does Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Near the top of all audio books I have listened to.

Have you listened to any of Lisette Lecat’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Lisette Lecat is truly outstanding. This is really a performance, not just a narration. I hesitate to recommend the text version because I don't know if I would have enjoyed it nearly as much as I did the audio version. I might have, but her reading was simply superb.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Elisabeth
  • Durham, NC, United States
  • 08-01-09

So different and honest

Fuller's biography about growing up as a white African during the 70s and 80s in each African country ruled/formerly ruled by the British is fascinating. She doesn't gloss over her own rough behavior or warts of her family. Their living experience is really interesting as it was totally different than growing up in the US during the same period.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Christine
  • Port MoresbyPapua New Guinea
  • 06-20-08

This is similar to my life

I was born in Papua New Guinea in early 1970's to a Papua New Guinean mother and Scottish father. I could relate to alot of the issues and some incidents in the story - the racism, the colonist attitudes, hurt parents and the richness of the country.
I got a good sense of Africa (and I havn't been there).
Really liked the story. Olivia died by accident, it wasn't anyones fault.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Barbara
  • Marietta, GA, United States
  • 02-05-07

An interesting tale, well-told, but...

Alexandra Fuller has led a fascinating life, not always by her own choosing. Her parents were untrustworthy, accidental carpetbaggers who fumbled through a sinister landscape to which they had no claim, and to which they felt entitled. The story Fuller tells is occasionally funny and often heartbreaking. It is her own story, and she is to be congratulated for surviving it. But this book is not for everyone, and will sometimes leave the listener feeling contempt for the primary personae. The lilting, perfect voice of Lisette Lecat, who also reads the more-affable "#1 Ladies Detective Agency" series, is always welcome.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Jana
  • Richmond, CA, United States
  • 03-27-04

Superb, fascinating

Fascinating, enchanting, well-written, beautifully narrated. Poignant story about women dealing with life and overcoming hardships amidst the harsh and foreign beauty of several different African countries as white foreigners. The story got better and more enjoyable with every hour I listened.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Completely depressing.

Would not recommend this to anyone, regardless of age. Bear quality is author's ability to write.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Hard to get into

Would you try another book from Alexandra Fuller and/or Lisette Lecat?

I doubt I would look for another book by Fuller. Lecat is a good narrator, but not so good that she can make a story that I didn't find compelling more so.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

There didn't seem to be a real goal in the writing of it.

Was Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight worth the listening time?

I read it for a book group and for that purpose it was, but I wouldn't have picked it up and finished it without that.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Very well written, expertly read - narrator had a pleasant accent and made for easy listerpning.

I thought the story of Bobo's formative years was very interesting - her world and family so different and engaging, bold, unexpected, exciting.
The description of her family was fascinating, each member of the family described in a truthful yet witty way. Her mother was so much, fun and yet very sharp and unpredictable at times.
I recommend it to readers who enjoy great non-fiction in the form of a memoir - but a page-turner, taking place in some very dangerous places in Africa.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Interesting!

Sad but interesting. gave insight as to what it would be like to live in Africa.