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Publisher's Summary

A former slave who became a successful dressmaker with her own business, became the dresser, dressmaker and confidante to Mary Todd Lincoln during Abraham Lincoln's presidential adminstration. Behind the Scenes tells the story of the rise of Elizabeth Keckley from abused slave to independent business woman to friend of the First Lady of the land during the Civil War.

Elizabeth Hobbs Keckley (1818-1907) was a slave for more than 40 years and became a reknown seamstress, activist and author. The daughter of a house slave and her master, Keckley was taught to read and write, which was illegal and a rare priviledge. But her status did not protect her from a life of work that began at four years old and included severe abuse from her master's wife. After purchasing her freedom as an adult, Keckley moved to Washington DC and her sewing talents soon garnered an impressive clientele of affluent legislators. Keckley's reknown brought her to the attention of Mary Todd Lincoln, and they immediately formed a strong bond. Keckley met Mary Todd Lincoln on the day of Abraham's first inauguration and spent the next 6 years as the personal dressmaker and dresser for the First Lady. They remained close after the Lincolns left Washington. In an unfortunate attempt to help the nearly destitute former first lady, Keckley published her memoirs detailing the private lives of her owners and later the Lincolns. The immediate reaction to Behind the Scenes was catastrophic for Keckley; Mary Todd Lincoln felt betrayed and attacked and refused to speak to her, her elite dressmaking clientele left her and critics everywhere exorciated Keckley for her "honesty". Keckley never fully recovered from the scandal and died alone and destitute.

Public Domain (P)2012 Alcazar AudioWorks

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Performance
  • Story

No Southern Accent

Who was your favorite character and why?

Obviously Elizabeth Keckley and her courage in writing the book

How could the performance have been better?

Please! The affected attempt at a Southern accent was REALLY annoying! Would have been a much better read in a different, less fake accent. I am Southern and it was very irritating. Narrator also too dramatic when the tone of the book didn't demand it

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, if I could.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
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Well presented piece of first person history

The end section in defense of Mrs. Lincoln's actions after the President's death gets a bit bogged down, but it is still a fascinating presentation from behind the scenes.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Interesting read, not a great reader

As a Lincoln fanatic, I loved the "insider information" of this book, which was entirely scandalous when it was first published. For that reason, I enjoyed the book.

That being said, I should have just read the book. I didn't care for the reader, and her strange accent was distracting. Everything was read in a tone of surprise, which wasn't fitting.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Understanding

This was a fascinating memoir that sheds clarity on the freed woman dressmaker and her relationship with Mary Todd Lincoln. The narrator did a fabulous job. I felt like I was listening to Mrs Keckley very voice. Worth listening to

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terrible reader. book is slow, over used on word

what could have been said in 5 words took twenty. not a fan of this book or reader

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Worst performance ever!

This narrator was an insult to the words and experience of Elizabeth Keckley. I could have withstood her ridiculous accent, but the way she randomly empasized words was irritating in the extreme. It was a very poor decision to try to imitate the accent of a 19th century African American, and the effect was condescending and intolerable. I blame this on the director as much as the narrator. Good luck making it through this one! I suggest reading the book instead.

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Very poor dialect

Might have been a good story. Narration is intolerable. Disappointing. Narration is halting as if mimicing the reading skills of the author. Very unpleasant.