• Bad with Money

  • The Imperfect Art of Getting Your Financial Sh*t Together
  • By: Gaby Dunn
  • Narrated by: Gaby Dunn
  • Length: 5 hrs and 52 mins
  • 4.3 out of 5 stars (186 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The beloved writer-comedian expands on her popular podcast with an engaging and empowering financial literacy audiobook for Millennials and Gen Z. 

In the first episode of her Bad with Money podcast, Gaby Dunn asked patrons at a coffee shop two questions: First, what’s your favorite sex position? Everyone was game to answer, even the barista. Then, she asked how much money was in their bank accounts. People were aghast. “That’s a very personal question,” they insisted. And therein lies the problem.

Dunn argues that our inability to speak honestly about money is our number-one barrier to understanding it, leading us to feel alone, ashamed, and anxious, which in turns makes us feel even more overwhelmed by it. In Bad with Money, she reveals the legitimate, systemic reasons behind our feeling of helplessness when it comes to personal finance, demystifying the many signposts on the road to getting our financial shit together, like how to choose an insurance plan or buy a car, sign up for a credit card or take out student loans. She speaks directly to her audience, offering advice on how to make that #freelancelyfe work for you, navigate money while you date, and budget without becoming a Nobel-winning economist overnight.

Even a topic as notoriously dry as money becomes hilarious and engaging in the hands of Dunn, who weaves her own stories with the perspectives of various comedians, artists, students, and more, arguing that - even without selling our bodies to science or suffering the indignity of snobby thrift-shop buyers - we can all start taking control of our financial futures. 

©2019 Gaby Dunn (P)2019 Simon & Schuster

Hear from Gaby Dunn about her new book, Bad with Money

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What listeners say about Bad with Money

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  • Overall
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Interesting but not helpful

I bought this audio book expecting to get a better understanding of how to control my finances and learn new ways to manage money...the entire book just kind of feels like her talking WAY to long about her past and her resume. It took atleast 2 hours into the 5 hour book before any real tips starting coming through but then would go right back to the experience not relevant to the top.

24 people found this helpful

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Lacking... "Getting Your Sh*T Together"

There was a lot of talk about this happened to me and that happened to me and so on, but really lacked any perspective on how to actually "Get YOUR financial Sh*t together" and I also did not care to hear the final "we need socialism" chapter at the end. It was a good listen but I did not get what I thought I'd get out of the book.

12 people found this helpful

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Want to be bad with money...

Want to be bad with money? Listen to this book.

While it's an interesting story, I found very little financial wisdom or advice in this book. It's more of a biography of Gaby Dunn's personal financial life, culminating in "I'm still bad with money, but if we could all just be socialist life would be better".

Be warned, there's a lot of racism in the book. The racism is pitted against "White Men" and "Cis Gender", so you won't see much pushback from society (why we accept racism in any form is crazy to me). But it's there nonetheless. It's a bit off-putting to hear such overt racism make it's way through the author's keyboard and past at least one professional editor.

I enjoyed Gaby's story and open acknowledgement of financial mistakes. We're all like Gaby. We're all bad with money. That part was good.

As for the rest of it. Meh. It's just a blank account of life as it is. "Weddings cost $25,000 on average."

What? No commentary. This doesn't sound even the least bit crazy?

Then there's the part where the author is angry because a couple rented their house on AirBNB to cover their wedding. Apparently expensive weddings are a human right in America now. As if these people should have been given a 5-figure wedding just for being alive.

Nevermind. I'm done. Read it if you want. Personally I think there are way better personal finance books out there.

11 people found this helpful

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A polished turd.

The author/reader is a vapid, self-obsessed millennial hipster with a martyr complex. This book was minimal on self-budgeting wisdom and filled with anecdotal fluff... Dunn attempts to convince the reader that being a lazy hipster in a 900-dollar/month Greenpoint, Brooklyn apartment that her grandmother helped to subsidized is akin to living through "The Grapes of Wrath," not to mention plenty of white, cis-male blaming for 95% of her woes in life. I feel dumber for not selecting a different audiobook to help me in my quest for more savings.

4 people found this helpful

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Autobiography -I didn't set my expectations right

This book could be helpful for young kids if you can make them to read it but definitely not for people in their 40ties

3 people found this helpful

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Don’t waste your money on this!

Very little real financial advice. Non-stop promotion of the socialist/progressive/liberal agenda and how the system is stack against anyone who is not a rich, white male. Disgusting! Needs a warning label.

3 people found this helpful

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White Devil! White Devil!

Remember the Ace Ventura movie, where Jim Carrey keeps getting called "White Devil", there is a lot of this in the book. While listening, I was told probably 8-10 times that because I am a white man, everything is simple and handed to me. The stories start off interesting. Where coming out of high school or college, you aren't really taught anything about saving money, and the number of traps that start from early college age (such as financial aid, easy access to credit cards, etc.) But then it quickly takes an ultra left turn. Multiple times, white men are portrayed as public enemy number 1. "Douchebags" - term used in the book, not mine. Full of entitlement and of course, the massive part of the problem.

Then even the decent warnings about stuff like college come back around full circle with stating that university should be free to everyone. Random stories of minorities, who while they might have not paid their bills on time, is not their fault, but rather debt collectors because they single them out.

There is a lot of blame passed around for reasons people make financial mistakes, but not a lot of owning up to actual mistakes or advice to fix it. Of course, plenty of references to voting people out of government.

To be fair, I enjoyed the author reading her book. That is what kept me listening until the end. Some of her points were valid, such as the chapter on unpaid internships. But while that was a talking point, it really didn't have much to do with how to "get your financial sh*t together". In fact really only 1 chapter offered financial advice in the form of talking bullet points on different retirement accounts and reciting examples of how much people should have in savings.

If you are not a white male, and are excited about Bernie Sanders announcing his run for 2020, this book may be for you. Otherwise, probably not.

1 person found this helpful

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The best book I've read in years

I feel like Gaby knows me. Her writing style is so relatable and down to earth. I learned so much about my spending problems and where it stemmed from. I also feel a kindred spirit with Gaby since i grew up jewish in south florida and understood a lot of the references she made. I had a very eye opening conversation with my mom after reading this and now she has purchased a copy for herself.

1 person found this helpful

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Probably the worst personal finance book

Probably the worst personal finance book I have ever read/listened to. Don't waste your time.

1 person found this helpful

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Good Book!

The book is very much like the author’s podcast but more info in less time. It’s a really good book for financial idiots.

1 person found this helpful