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Publisher's Summary

In Sapiens, he explored our past; in Homo Deus, he looked to our future. Now, one of the most innovative thinkers on the planet turns to the present to make sense of today’s most pressing issues. 

How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human? How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news? Are nations and religions still relevant? What should we teach our children?  

Yuval Noah Harari’s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into today’s most urgent issues as we move into the unchartered territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.  

In 21 accessible chapters that are both provocative and profound, Harari builds on the ideas explored in his previous books, untangling political, technological, social, and existential issues and offering advice on how to prepare for a very different future from the world we live now in: How can we retain freedom of choice when Big Data is watching us? What will the future workforce look like, and how should we ready ourselves for it? How should we deal with the threat of terrorism? Why is liberal democracy in crisis?  

Harari’s unique ability to make sense of where we have come from and where we are going has captured the imaginations of millions around the world. Here he invites listeners to consider values, meaning, and personal engagement in a world full of noise and uncertainty. When we are deluged with irrelevant information, clarity is power. Presenting complex contemporary challenges clearly and accessibly, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is essential listening.

©2018 Yuval Noah Harari (P)2018 Random House Audio

What members say

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

All 3 of his books were amazing

I find Yuval very insightful and his views are very unbiased and open! I have enjoyed all his books so far.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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A world controlled by cognitive dissonance

Yuval Harari is a Historian, Philosopher, Scientist, Futurist, and formost a thinker of the 21 century. This is rare in a world of specialist, and indeed his books reveal connections from multidisciplinary subjects no others have achieved. It’s always a real pleasure digesting his intellect.

In 21 Lessons for the 21st century he does not disappoint. He reveals the present dilemma facing the world. Nationalism does not resolve global problems such as Global Warming, Global unemployment due to automation, or Nuclear threats, Genetic Engineering, and other high risk high reward scientific endeavours. Only a global authority can act, failing which nations will accelerate threats to get ahead.

Tragedy of the commons has just gone global, and danger looms if we don’t act sensibly. Understanding our cognitive dissonance, and biases, and accepting we are part of a global community is something discussed in a convincing manner. Delving to what is real and what is fiction Harari opens our eyes to how such fallacies control our lives.

A highly recommended read, along with his other books.

24 of 27 people found this review helpful

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A superb book by a very good thinker

This book should be read from cover to cover. It deserves and rewards careful contemplation.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

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Great intellectual entertainment with anticlimax

The book is 90% intellectual entertainment, largely borrowed from last two books. I still enjoyed listening to it as the concepts and arguments are very revealing and not always obvious. However, all the argument seemed to be entertaining and disconnected from chapter to chapter rather than logically leading to a conclusion at the end of the book. my favorite chapter was 20 which essentially concluded that life has no meaning and everything we ascribe to is an attempt to construct a story for us. until this point, I felt author was intellectually honest, even though the conclusion makes for a very difficult life going forward (with no meaning). but then author fell into the very trap he asked people to avoid by constructing a story based on vipasana, mind, observing self and other spiritual stuff that cannot withstand a honest intellectual debate. only thing I can maybe agree to is the mystery of consciousness but that doesn't given us enough meaning to answer life's big questions. also, according to author, AI can manipulate our mind in the future which by logic concludes that mind is not but biochemical reactions and therefore cannot be "reality".

despite criticism, I still recommend this book of you haven't read last two books and if you have focus on chapter 20 and maybe 21 (if you don't mind anticlimax)

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Book of 2018

Best book in 2018 hands down.
as usual, Yuval exhilarates us with very deep insights into reality and present affairs, why we are here and what we ought to do and be if we wanna own the future

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Decent. Not great. Too much speculative philosophy

21 was a slight disappointment. It's more philosophizing and speculating about this and that as opposed to fact and research driven insights like in Homo Deus or Sapiens. That's fine but my throughout this book I couldn't shake this feeling Mr Harari is on a ego driven mission to become yet another "thought leader" of sorts. We'll see how his career trajectory pans out but personally I prefer his research and data driven material.
Derek Perkins, who also narrated Sapiens, is excellent as always.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Good stuff, but mostly repeats

I loved Sapiens and Dues, recommended to many friends and family. I was really excited for this book but was disappointed as so much of it was repeat from earlier books, it felt like the Cliff Notes for Dues. If I hadn't read the other books this would be 5* all the way, but I did...

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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story of human kind

this is an essential read as:
1. it shows the most logical explanation of current state of the humanity
2. it tries to explain how we got here
3. it offers a basis for real discussions to happen without too much confusion for to closed mindsets
4. it dispels most important biases that humanity faces without even realizing it.
5. it concludes with a path to understanding the world within by introspection.

a must read for every sapien

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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A good book, but still, not as good as the other 2 of the series

A good book, with plenty of scientific insight and good findings. But still, frequently it diverge to close to self-help, and also the last parr is basically Buddhist propaganda. I enjoyed it, but if you're a fan of Sapiens and Homo Deus, lower your expectations.

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Harari Doesn’t Dissapoint

I read Sapiens and it was more powerful than any drug. Homo Deus was great as well... the ideas he presents are like riding an intellectual high. I really enjoyed the fact that in this book we got to find out more about how he feels about topics that don’t have clear answers. I can’t wait to buy the book and reread it.