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Publisher's Summary

Following her National Book Award-nominated debut novel, A Kind of Freedom, Margaret Wilkerson Sexton returns with this equally elegant and historically inspired story of survivors and healers, of black women and their black sons, set in the American South.

In 1925, Josephine is the proud owner of a thriving farm. As a child, she channeled otherworldly power to free herself from slavery. Now, her new neighbor, a white woman named Charlotte, seeks her company, and an uneasy friendship grows between them. But Charlotte has also sought solace in the Ku Klux Klan, a relationship that jeopardizes Josephine's family.

Nearly 100 years later, Josephine's descendant, Ava, is a single mother who has just lost her job. She moves in with her white grandmother, Martha, a wealthy but lonely woman who pays her grandchild to be her companion. But Martha's behavior soon becomes erratic, then even threatening, and Ava must escape before her story and Josephine's converge.

The Revisioners explores the depths of women's relationships: powerful women and marginalized women, healers and survivors. It is a novel about the bonds between a mother and a child, and the dangers that upend those bonds. At its core, The Revisioners ponders generational legacies, the endurance of hope, and the undying promise of freedom.

©2019 Margaret Wilkerson Sexton (P)2019 Blackstone Publishing

Editor's Pick

Family magic
"I must admit, what first drew me to this title is that the author and I share a first name. Then when I learned that Margaret Wilkerson Sexton’s first novel, A Kind of Freedom, was longlisted for the 2017 National Book Award, I was curious to see how she would follow up such a dazzling debut. Moving back and forth in time, The Revisioners tells the haunting story of Josephine’s conjured escape from slavery as a child, her life as a widow and farm-owner, and the dangerous friendship she forms with her white neighbor as the Ku Klux Klan takes root in post-Reconstruction South. Fast-forward 100 years, and Josephine’s great-great-great-granddaughter, Ava, has reluctantly moved in with her white grandmother who’s spiraling into dementia—or is it something more? What happens in between is the heart of this sweeping, multigenerational saga that's beautifully performed by Myra Lucretia Taylor and Adenrele Ojo."
Margaret H., Audible Editor

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What listeners say about The Revisioners

Average Customer Ratings
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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
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    5 out of 5 stars

Great story

This novel is a complex intriguing story that offers a message of the strength and courage of African Americans passed from one generation to the next. Really moves away from the mentality of African Americans as simply victims, victimized but not victim mentality.

1 person found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • RW
  • 04-13-21

Felt Unfinished

This book ended unfinished to me. There could have easily been 2 more chapters to wrap up the storylines.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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Good book...wish there was more

Loved the story, but the ending left me hanging a bit. The narration was well done.

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good but inconsistent characters and relationships

Really great and emotional story. I enjoyed the switching between timelines, both were executed well.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Horrible, couldn't finish

The way the main character treated her grandmother was awful. I couldn't finish this book. It was TERRIBLE!! The narration tore my emotions apart, and I don't want to give this book a chance.

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Devastating in the best way

This isn’t a light read but man, it was so good. Really felt a connection to the characters and the performances by the two women really drove that, they were spot on.

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Deep!

Deep!!! Great book. Definitely will recommend to others. Great pace. Well developed. Deep!! Deep!! Deep!!

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

WRONG ACCENT

Can't get lost in story because of the moonlight and magnolia accent of the narrator. A New Orleans black accent and white accent is so radically different from the prep school southern drip narrator uses. It's so little effort to learn, and we are listening so how can I go with the story when the narration is so bad.
Ms Wilkerson Sexton is a really fine writer, and I so enjoyed the spot on details about New Orleans Seventh Ward, in "A Kind of Freedom".
She peels back the curtain on Creole life in the 40's and she tells things I didn't know. That City Park was segregated then was an ugly fact of life. When Evelyn's daughter hits bad times in The East (New Orleans East), aka The Orient. It was a warm bath feeling just relaxed and had a good friend in my ear telling me what had happened in her life.

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I cried and cheered!

The author did a great job weaving and connecting the past to the present. There were many times while reading this book that I gasped out loud or even spoke aloud to whoever might have been in trouble or in thought. I laughed snd I cried. The only reason I did not give this book 5 stars was because of its ending. I will not say more.

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WOW!

Amazing story! Performance was powerful as well! I could feel the power, the emotions..... as if I were there.