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Slow Motion Ghosts

By: Jeff Noon
Narrated by: Dean Williamson
Length: 13 hrs and 11 mins
3.5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Random House presents the audiobook edition of Slow Motion Ghosts by Jeff Noon, read by Dean Williamson.

A dark and labyrinthine thriller from a bold new voice in crime fiction.

It is 1981. London is bruised by austerity, social unrest and racial tension, and the police are at war. Anger has erupted in the Brixton Riots and is finding expression in protest, anarchy and punk. For Detective Inspector Hobbes, the battle lines are being redrawn within his own ranks as right and wrong are clouded by prejudice.

Into this mess comes a murder. A promising young singer has been maimed and killed, and the artistry of the crime is disturbing. On the hunt for the killer, Hobbes begins an investigation that will lead him deep into a subculture hidden beneath the everyday. A cult of personality that hides from the problems of the city and escapes to a world of its own, a world that is at once seductive and devastating. How far will Hobbes have to go to learn the truth? And how many more must die before he does?

Bringing the trademark imagination of his acclaimed early novels, Jeff Noon has delivered a police procedural with a difference - an intricate, twisting crime novel that pulls you in and doesn’t let go.

Jeff Noon is the author of six acclaimed novels, Vurt, Pollen, Automated Alice, Nymphomation, Needle in the Groove and Falling Out of Cars, as well as two collections of short fiction, and is also the crime fiction reviewer for The Spectator. He lives in Brighton.

©2019 Jeff Noon (P)2019 Random House Audiobooks

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it is ok but it doesn't feel like classic Jeff

While the story was cohesive and most characters felt well written it was missing some of the mystery and wonder of the classic Noon novels I remember from my youth. Or perhaps I am just getting old.

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  • Lawrence
  • 02-09-19

Revisiting themes of love, loss and communion

I thoroughly enjoyed this, the hard boiled chandler references are almost a sleight of hand, included as a formality of the genre rather than an apolitical kow towing to some dead writers genius.

I was taken in by Vurt, in its own way it established a beachhead in my soul and I’ve been waiting a very long time to see Jeff Noon deliver on its promises. Pixel Juice meandered, Automated Alice list itself in some fashionable (at the time) non linear narrative but Vurt was the goods.

Echoes of loss permeate Slow Motion Ghosts, as it weaves an engrossing somewhat psychotic “emo” tragedy, with a sophisticated empathy response to the tragedy of middle age experienced by a man whose given his life to the “job” and still believes he can do some good. In this it holds a remarkable balance and maturity of comprehension. This is not the book of a young writer.

I miss Vurt, and I’m glad I decided to follow Jeff Noon, enough to see into some of his other places. Noon kinda disappeared for a while and he seems to have found his voice again. He’s no longer flavour of the month, he’s solid now. He feels corporeal again. Unlike many older people, he hasn’t forgotten what he wanted to say when he was younger, now he has the skills and the ability to talk that tale and produce a good page turner as he does so. In many respects this one has far more depth than they usually do.

That was always Jeff Noons compelling skill, constantly adding layers which rely on the reader to unravel, deliberately placed easily missed, places to catch the meandering mind and take it by the hand and set it back into the path.

I miss the Game Cat, Scribble, General Hobart and the hauntings of the Vurt but I’m so pleased to have met Hobbes, King Lost and Edenville. I hope Noon gets to write a lot more because it feels to me that he has another great book inside him waiting to get out. Now I know what took me into the Vurt and why I’ve waited so patiently for him to come to fruition.