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Publisher's Summary

In June 2011, Julian Assange received an unusual visitor: the chairman of Google, Eric Schmidt, arrived from America at Ellingham Hall, the country residence in Norfolk, England where Assange was living under house arrest. For several hours the besieged leader of the world’s most famous insurgent publishing organization and the billionaire head of the world’s largest information empire locked horns. The two men debated the political problems faced by society, and the technological solutions engendered by the global network - from the Arab Spring to Bitcoin. They outlined radically opposing perspectives: for Assange, the liberating power of the Internet is based on its freedom and statelessness. For Schmidt, emancipation is at one with US foreign policy objectives and is driven by connecting non-Western countries to American companies and markets. These differences embodied a tug-of-war over the Internet’s future that has only gathered force subsequently.

When Google Met WikiLeaks presents the story of Assange and Schmidt’s encounter. Both fascinating and alarming, it contains an edited transcript of their conversation and extensive, new material, written by Assange specifically for this book, providing the best available summary of his vision for the future of the Internet.

©2014 Julian Assange (P)2014 Audible Inc.

Critic Reviews

"Narrator Tom Pile effectively channels the WikiLeaks founder's confidence, force, and acerbity." (AudioFIle)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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A must-read

Along with Greenwald's disclosures via Snowden this short work shows clearly that Google is at the centre of current US strategies for global dominance, while people of courage and conscience continue to be persecuted.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Must Read 4 Those W/Interest In Futurology&Infosec

important book to read. reading a piece of history. wish every one would read/listen to this book.

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It seems those who are suspicious of Google have good cause

I especially liked the comparison of what Eric Schmidt wrote in his book about Julian Assange's motivations for redacting portions of leaks and what Assange actually said.

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Good information about wikileaks overall

Easy to listen, quick, and informative about Google's role and what is wikileaks. Very interesting.

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  • Gregory Monk
  • 04-26-17

Interesting insight

Where does When Google Met WikiLeaks rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

It's certainly one of the important non-fiction books I have seen on here, though of course there are many. It is unique, however.

What was one of the most memorable moments of When Google Met WikiLeaks?

Hearing Assange discuss some of his hopes for the future of peer reviewed journalism and the more generalised ideals he holds, in his own words is useful when combating the sheer amount of negative press he gets.

What about Tom Pile’s performance did you like?

A narrator must always be praised if they are able to make a book like this listenable. He has to start every sentence with the initials of the person speaking but he ensures this doesn't detract from the content.

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  • Paul J Reichl
  • 05-24-17

Enlightening and relevant

Great insight into the world of censored information and what motivates censorship. Interesting discussion on misinformation.