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Publisher's Summary

When Isabelle Poole meets Dr. Preston Grind, she's just about out of options. She recently graduated from high school and is pregnant with her art teacher's baby. Her mother is dead, and her father is a drunk. The art teacher is too much of a head case to help raise the child. Izzy knows she can be a good mother, but without any money or prospects she's left searching.

So when Dr. Grind offers her a space in The Infinite Family Project, she accepts. Housed in a spacious compound in Tennessee, she joins nine other couples, all with children the same age as her newborn son, to raise their children as one extended family. Grind's theory is that the more parental love children receive, the better off they are.

This attempt at a utopian ideal - funded by an eccentric billionaire - starts off promising: Izzy enjoys the kids, reading to them, and teaching them to cook. She even forms a bond with her son more meaningful than she ever expected. But soon, the gentle equilibrium among the families is upset, and it all starts to disintegrate: Unspoken resentments between the couples begin to fester; the project's funding becomes tenuous; and Izzy's feelings for Dr. Grind, who is looking to expunge his own painful childhood, make her question her participation in this strange experiment in the first place.

Written with the same compassionate voice, disarming sense of humor, and quirky charm that made The Family Fang such a success, Perfect Little World is a poignant look at how the best families are the ones we make for ourselves.

©2017 Kevin Wilson (P)2017 HarperCollins Publishers

What listeners say about Perfect Little World

Average Customer Ratings
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  • 4 out of 5 stars
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    4
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Story
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    86
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    82
  • 3 Stars
    45
  • 2 Stars
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    9

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Infinitely awesome

Can’t wait to share this book with my Book Club! I think it was an excellent read I would highly recommend it. Definitely give it a shot if you’re on a the fence about it. The characters were well-developed as is the storyline and every turn and every twist made it was perfect.

4 people found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

I love a Kevin Wilson , just not this one.

This is the only poor review I’ve ever given, Im quite easy to please. The concept was fantastic. Can’t tell if it was the narrator or the writing but it dragged on ,reiterating the same things over and over again. The narrator is perfect for a Nicholas Sparks book but not for this type writing.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Not as good as The Family Fang but still worth...

...reading. Wilson delivers another interesting take on what family means. I hadn't planned to read this book--didn't think it sounded that interesting--but when I realized it was by the author of The Family Fang (one of the most tragic yet funny books I've read), I had to buy it. As stated, not as good as TFF, but I never lost interest in the story or the characters, all of whom were interesting in their own ways.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Warning:spoilers

A unique and complex story and impressive narration, but somehow the way the ending was so neatly tied up felt a bit too perfect. But I enjoyed it all the same! Sometimes when kids are featured prominently, I find the narration of their voices (by an adult narrator) to be a little grating. It’s unavoidable in this book but it was handled well.

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A Different Kevin Wilson

I love all Kevin Wilson's books because they are creative, unique and profound. This one is different in that while his usual quirkiness I love so much is non-existent, it's still very good. Fans of Wilson's more extreme style might be disappointed with this shift to more normalcy, so be advised that this book is not intended for wild entertainment with a deep underlying message like the others, it is much more straightforward.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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Almost Perfect Little Book

This is the third book by Kevin Wilson I’ve listened to. I love his creativity in creating unique scenarios and making them believable. The dialog, his descriptions, the characters all come alive and are very real. I did find Izzy’s character to be a bit unpredictable and was confused by her actions and reactions at times. She had certain character traits that seemed to change over time and her behavior was inconsistent in my opinion. I don’t want to go into detail and spoil anything for anyone. But aside from that and also being confused by the beginning of the book because I don’t see how it ties in (I’m going to have to go back and listen to the beginning again), I thought the book was very well-done. Kevin Wilson once again takes a somewhat weird premise (a la Nothing to See Here, about children who catch on fire) and makes a completely credible story from it. His exploration of the concept of group child rearing in a sort of utopian community is fascinating, including some creative ideas on how things might (and do) go wrong. Lastly, a shout-out to Therese Plummer, who does an excellent job of making each of the many characters sound unique - not an easy task. I appreciated her narration, as I did for Family Fang, another weird and wonderful book by Kevin Wilson.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Stick with Nothing to See Here

I loved the authors top seller, Nothing to See Here so I wanted to give another title a try. It’s finishable but poor plot and character development. His other book was amazing and I’ll continue to recommend him as an author, but this book does not reflect his talents as a writer.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Disjointed and Disappointing

After reading “Nothing to See Here,” also by Kevin Wilson, I eagerly looked for all books he had written, with the expectation that they would be as interesting and as fun a read. I struggled to maintain interest and hoped that I would get to a place where the story and its characters would all come together. Unfortunately, it was very disappointing and I finished the book wishing I could recaptured the lost hours of my life spent reading Perfect Little World!

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Very good but strange ending.

I really loved this book. It was captivating and enjoyable. The characters were easy to like. The only thing is the ending was strange and abrupt. Without giving it away, I felt there was much left to be desired about the main character’s thing with older men.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

Don't bother

After the brilliance of "Nothing to See Here," I approached this book with great enthusiasm. Very disappointing. I suppose it would be possible to write a more pedantic, pointless, and boring book, but I sincerely hope no one out there will attempt to do so.