Regular price: $19.95

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Editorial Reviews

For any foodie or trivia junkie looking for some delicious and light fare Lobsters Scream When You Boil Them entertains while it informs, clearing the air on many facts and tips that people tend to spout off when talking about food or cooking. Using cooking science, chemistry, and tested methods to dispel myths like the need to serve butter at room temperature or hot foods cooling body temperature, Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarborough keep an amusing tone while providing interesting and useful information and recipes. John McLain’s delivery will have you digging in, as his deep voice lends the air of an instruction manual while emphasizing the fun, sometimes sarcastic tone that attacks these myths, often based on nothing more than hearsay.

Publisher's Summary

Is the five-second rule for real? Will eating carrots improve your eyesight? Is your cookware a health hazard? Do spicy foods cool you down?

Has your grandmother been lying to you all these years?

No, no, no, no, and...probably. In this entertaining and informative reference guide, award-winning cookbook authors Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough take on more than 100 popular kitchen myths and dish up answers to all your burning questions about food science and lore. No longer must you wait for your butter to reach room temperature before you bake or panic because you forgot to soak your dried beans for dinner. This handy book explains how knowing the truth behind these urban legends can help you be a better chef in your own home and offers 25 delicious recipes so you can practice. Whether you’re a serious foodie, an avid dieter, a trivia lover, or are just searching for the secret to the perfect cup of coffee, Lobsters Scream When You Boil Them is essential countertop reading and a whole lot of fun.

©2011 Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

More from the same

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    8
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    7
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    3

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    8
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • GH
  • Sherborn, MA, United States
  • 09-04-13

Fast paced debunking + 1 cup of humor

This book leads us on a fast paced debunking of the top 100 food myths. This is a great resource to hand to your spouse or significant other who knows nothing about cooking and say -- "see, now be quiet. The things I have been telling you are now in print." For an experienced cook, 95 of the 100 are already known but you may not know the exact reasons. Only a few are in the huh range.

The narration is a solid but slow in 1X speed. I listened to it in 3X speed and got through the entire book in a couple of hours. This is easily done. I wasn't interested in the recipes just the myths.

This book appeals to both the experienced home cook all the way to the neophyte. Professionals should skip it as all of what is in this book you already know. As long as you listen at a higher speed, it is definitely worth the listen.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Great content, but bad delivery

Would you consider the audio edition of Lobsters Scream When You Boil Them to be better than the print version?

I haven't read the print version, but I imagine it would be a lot more enjoyable.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of John McLain?

Anyone else. Well, except for Gilbert Gottfied, Hillary Clinton or Fran Drescher.

Any additional comments?

Narrator John McLain's delivery is slow, low, gravely, and full of an unnecessary snarky tone when he speaks. So weird and distracting sounding. And...he has an annoying tendency to go down in his voice during most of the phrasing and at the end the sentences he speaks. Reading a fun cooking & science book calls for a clear, authoritative, and ultimately fun voice. McLain does not fit at all on here.

I looked elsewhere on Audible for McLain's other books, and WOW! He's narrated dozens of others. He may be a good fit for some other styles, but definitely not this.

NOTE: Listening to this book at a faster speed (1.25x to 1.5x) does help a bit.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Enjoyable and entertaining

A very well written book that keeps your attention from start to finish. WELL DONE!

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great Book!

I almost never bookmark my books but this one required several. I liked the different recipes provided along with the many tips and tricks to successful cooking.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Mr. C. G. Moore
  • 09-02-16

Not for me

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

I also found debunking food myths that I thought had been debunked 20 years ago meant the whole concept of the book was lost on me. It is also from a heavy American point of view that I could not connect with. It's light breezy writing juxtaposed with heavy science didn't help either

Would you ever listen to anything by Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough again?

no

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The whimsical writing and delivery grates after a while and recipes don't really come across on audio.

You didn’t love this book--but did it have any redeeming qualities?

I liked the science parts but too few and far between

Any additional comments?