Regular price: $29.40

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

W.E.B. Du Bois said, on the launch of his groundbreaking 1903 treatise, The Souls of Black Folk, "for the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color-line", a prescient statement. Setting out to show to the reader "the strange meaning of being black here in the dawning of the twentieth century," Du Bois explains the meaning of the emancipation, and its effect, and his views on the roles of the leaders of his race.
©1993 Jimcin Recordings; Cover Design ©2004 Brian J. Killavey

Critic Reviews

"The audio version of the classic work is also a stunning achievement. It is a moving experience to listen to Covell's interpretation. He reads as if he is Dubois. His bass voice matches the text so perfectly." (Kliatt)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    71
  • 4 Stars
    21
  • 3 Stars
    13
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    4

Performance

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    32
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    3

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    30
  • 4 Stars
    8
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Chandra
  • Oakland, CA, USA
  • 02-19-05

An eloquent & educational history

This is an amazing book - informing and inspiring. DuBois masterfully combines history, sociology, music, and poetry. His descriptions of the lives of Black (and White) people in the nineteenth-century U.S. are poignant and compassionate, his critiques are brilliant and courageous. His predictions of social injustice unrest arising from the failures of Reconstruction and continuing racial prejudice, were particularly wrenching. My only complaint is that Walter Covell read a little too fast - DuBois' prose is complex, as is the subject matter, and I got lost several times.

31 of 32 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

very enlightening for this white listener

However much I thought I understood about black experience, the stories and essays in this book have shown it to me in so much more depth. And now that another 100 years have passed, so much and so little has changed.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Beautifully told

Information told that relates to now society but with literature so strong hard not to want to continue for each passing chapter.