Regular price: $22.80

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

The Admirals tells the story of how history's only five-star admirals triumphed in World War II and made the United States the world's dominant sea power.

Only four men in American history have been promoted to the five-star rank of Admiral of the Fleet: William Leahy, Ernest King, Chester Nimitz, and William Halsey. These four men were the best and the brightest the navy produced, and together they led the U.S. Navy to victory in World War II, establishing the United States as the world's greatest fleet.

In The Admirals, award-winning historian Walter R. Borneman tells their story in full detail for the first time. Drawing upon journals, ship logs, and other primary sources, he brings an incredible historical moment to life, showing us how the four admirals revolutionized naval warfare forever with submarines and aircraft carriers, and how these men - who were both friends and rivals - worked together to ensure that the Axis fleets lay destroyed on the ocean floor at the end of World War II.

©2012 Walter R. Borneman (P)2012 Hachette

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    448
  • 4 Stars
    183
  • 3 Stars
    43
  • 2 Stars
    9
  • 1 Stars
    3

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    401
  • 4 Stars
    148
  • 3 Stars
    54
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    6

Story

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    435
  • 4 Stars
    135
  • 3 Stars
    42
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Interesting overview

The book provides an overview of significant naval leaders of WWII. It also touches on the people they worked for and with(president and Army). Although unlike the individual biographies this book doesn’t get into the weeds. However, the overview provided some insight into their shared experiences and backgrounds while pointing out how 5 very different men made it to the pentacle of the naval service.
The presenter did a great and made the listening experience enjoyable.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Great story, great performance.

The story of the great Admirals of WWII. The content alone is excellent, but this is also a very well made audio book. I highly recommend it.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Not quite what I had in mind but still good.

I have no one to blame myself for this because it's in the title; this is not exactly a book pertaining to the naval tactics used in WWII Pacific theater of war but rather, a biography of the 5-star admirals that shaped the war. Clearly Borneman and Troxell did their research homework to get their facts straight and somehow managed to keep the collective tales compelling. The narrator is fantastic, perhaps a little deadpan at times but he is undoubtedly a serious orator for a serious book.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Fantastic Engaging History

Great insight into the Navy and the incredible leaders who won WWII. Any armchair historian and navy buf needs to explore this master work.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Excellent character analysis

What made the experience of listening to The Admirals the most enjoyable?

Understanding the admirals

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Admirals?

Midway

Any additional comments?

The author overlooks one major fact - Nimitiz, King, and Leahy never stood on the the bridge of a carrier and fought a battle. They were always far away. Fletcher catches hell, but he was there at the first carrier battles, right in the middle of the madness, trying to learn. Same for the Japanese Yamamoto and Nagumo. Another point, at Midway, Nimitz places his task forces at Point Luck. Necessary to attack the Japanese fleet, but risking a counter attack. Right after launching the Midway attack, the Japanese sent out search planes. Maps show how close the Japanese came to finding the American task forces. They had one hundred planes ready to attack, including 30 or more fighters. Those fighters would have fully engaged the American CAP leaving the bombers and torpedo planes a clear path. A second, and possibly third attack would have followed. Smaller in number certainly, but enough to finish the American fleet. Midway would fall and probably Nimitz too.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A Superb Look at 5 Admirals who Shaped the Navy

Story: This is one of those wonderful creations by a serious historian who also happens to be a gifted writer. This one goes up there with "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" as a complete history of its subject matter but told with real character and emotion and speaks to the underlying fabric of personalities and how they shape the world we live in.

Performance: A flawless narration by Brian Troxel. All Audible narrations should be like this. Professional, clean, and NO Dramatization! Hooray! He sets the bar that other Audible narrators should try to hurdle, though they will have quite a time.

Overall: I hate using this term, but the fact is, this is a "Must Read" for anyone interested in the US NAVY, the Naval warfare of the Second world War, or anyone who just likes a good story that happens to be true. Amazing and varied men who moved hell and sea to bring the biggest Naval conflagration in history to a successful conclusion. 5 more different personalities I could not create for a fictional work, yet they worked together in the real world to get it done. I cannot say enough about Walter Borne man's knowledge and treatment of the subject matter; absolutely perfect!


This audio book was provided by the author, narrator, or publisher at no cost in exchange for an unbiased review.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

outstanding

This was an excellent overview of the Second world war and the Admirals that changed the world.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Truly Inspiring

Borneman has given a gift to naval historians with "The Admirals." Each man is presented in detail, background, character, flaws and strengths, leadership experiences, awards, etc. He weaves the individual stories together through the first half of the 20th century masterfully, pausing purposely on each man as he plays his role in the lead-up to WWII. Once Japan attacks, the reader knows well these four players and Borneman then proceeds to depict their personal contributions to the war effort in a play-by-play accounting. It's hard to play favorites but Leahy has to stick out because of his incredible (personal) contribution to FDR's leadership. Halsey was in the slugfest, King the master of the long view and Nimitz the tactical genius. What a pleasurable "listen" which is also to say it was well presented.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Excellent!

This book at its most basic level will expand your understanding of the US Navy's role in the Second World War, however it's the way the author weaves the events together that will captivate your interest and leave you unable to stop listening.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Fine Audiobook, but......

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Brian Troxell?

Amazing to have a narrator who mispronounces so very many names of people, places, etc. of WW II & seemingly has no clue of the pronunciation of not everday....but not uncommon words such as, 'prescient'. Do not at all blame on Brian Troxell, as this conspicuous failing is a feature of virtually all 'Audible' history books.