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Publisher's Summary

This is the breathtaking adventure of the great Carthaginian general who shook the foundations of Rome. When conflict between Rome and Carthage resumed in 219 B.C., after a brief hiatus from the first Punic War, the Romans decided to invade Spain. Eluding several Roman legions sent out to intercept him in Spain and France, Hannibal Barca astoundingly led his small army of mercenaries over the Alps and thundered down into the Po Valley. The Carthaginian swept all resistance from his path and, as one victory led to another, drove a wedge between Rome and its allies. Hannibal marched up and down the Italian peninsula for 18 years, appearing well nigh invincible to a Rome which began to doubt itself for the first time in its history.

This violent and exciting narrative will thrill you with the accounts of heroism and brilliance displayed on both sides as the war raged mercilessly across the entire Western Mediterranean. Learn how the patience of Fabius Maximus and the genius of Lucius Cornelius Scipio finally turned the tide in this, the world's first "global" conflict...a conflict whose aftermath proved to be one of the most decisive and enduring events in world history. And finally, learn the secret to the success of Hannibal, the most brilliant military commander of all time.

© (P) 2003 Audio Connoisseur

What members say

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  • Overall

I would never had known...

From my history classes, I never learned the extent of the genius of this man. I cannot help but be amazed when I think about the things that Hannibal and his army endured. Throughout my educational history, I had gained a more than negative connotation to attach to the name, "Hannibal". After reading (listening to) this amazing accounting of not only Hannibal, but his brothers, father, and all of the Carthaginians for whom, Hannibal was a heroic champion, I have cast those thoughts aside. (Imagine, marching an army and elephants through the Alps to face the world's most feared Army!!!) I guarantee that you will want to hear this awesome story more than once!!!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • S
  • Andover, MA, USA
  • 09-18-05

Rome - Ancient Nazis?

Riveting book. Casts a new light on the brutality and ruthlessness of the Romans - the Nazis of their era. Ironically, Hannibal was of the semitic people of the African coast- destroyed in a roman holocaust

Extremely well read, well told. Since I knew what was going to happen to Carthage, it was difficult to hear the end, I had grown so fond of Hannibal.

6 of 8 people found this review helpful

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  • Performance
  • Story

Superb

Highly recommended, worth every penny spent. The narration is flawless, the story line is marvelous. Worth a listen any day.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Performance
  • Story

Good but not great

Still the definitive book on Hannibal by all accounts the book suffers by perhaps a lack of material to work with given the sources available. It gives only a cursory review of the major battles from a tactical perspective; however, the author states early that more qualified military writers have written extensively on this. His focus is on the man and how he approach the strategy of war. This is the books true insight and valued analysis. The distillation comes in the final chapter while the blocks of the arguments set out in this section were spread throughout the book. There is a slight short coming in this style as the detail behind these points are buried in with the rest of the text. Had seeds of the argument been planted in the text, for me it would be more memorable and a tighter woven narrative.

The Narrator is good until he does his Hannibal voice which just is a strange accent.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Masterfully written.

Where does Hannibal rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

A stand out for history buffs. Incredibly well written, deep explanation of the main figures and their motives, visceral and clear descriptions of battle sequences. A brilliantly narrated piece of work, one of the best if not the best narrator I've heard.

What did you like best about this story?

It played out like a great movie, but was made all the more enjoyable as it a tru account.

Which character – as performed by Charlton Griffin – was your favorite?

Well, the titular one, of course. Though I was very fond of Scipio's manner.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

The title.

Any additional comments?

Brilliant narration.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Performance
  • Story

More academic than I expected

While the book does a good job at portraying the life and times of Hannibal, it feels very drawn out at some points. Unless you want an in-depth study of his life, try a different book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • panda
  • Nashville, TN
  • 01-14-13

Really great book with 1 big historical innacuracy

I really loved this book. I did not know too much detail about the invasion of Hannibal and enjoyed hearing the details of the second Punic war. The performance was superb and the story was great. I took off one star for one historical inaccuracy that did sit in my craw. The author refers to Hannibal taking refuge with Antiochius III and describing that the coming battle with the Romans was unlike other warfare the Selucids engaged in. He mentions in passing the conflict in "Palestine". First of all, Antiochus III had excellent relations with his Jewish subjects in occupied Judea. The conflict, which is commemorated by the Jewish holiday of Hannukah, was with his son Antiochus IV. Secondly, there was no "Palestine", as this made up name was given to Judea by the Romans after the revolt in 60 C.E., some 300 years later. There never really was a country called "Palestine" in history, but the territory was referred to by that name after 63 C.E. Let's be historically accurate on this point, please!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Story

Hannibal -- Who Knew?

Wow! Since am a fan of ancient literature, I looked forward to this book -- but I didn't expect a page turner. But there you are! I am simply amazed at how much detail is found here -- the author must have scoured every nook and cranny to get so much information on a man who lived 200 years before Christ, never wrote a word himself, and was remembered primarily by his enemies (Romans) who really wanted to erase him from memory. The author argues that Hannibal is a greater general in some ways than Napolean, and that, but for Hannibal, there would really be no Julius Ceaser (he got a lot of good ideas from Hannibal.) But besides the numerous fascinating war scenarios, and the intriguing tatics devised by Hannibal -- he's also a remarkable man-- loyal, cunning, taciturn, humble, and, yes -- caring. He really sacrificed his life for Carthage. Even in 6th grade, for some reason, I always rooted for the Carthigians -- now even more so! So get settled in your easy chair, and prepare for a darn good yarn. Trust me, there's a lot more to know about Hannibal than you probably know. Nicely read too. Sound effects add a nice touch setting scenes, but never get out of hand, and the narrator successfully projects various character voices. I love his take on Hannibal.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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I've learned a lot about Hannibal

This audiobook tells what an amazing strategist Hannibal apparently whas. We all know he went over the Alps with elephants. Well, that's only part of the story. He managed to win several battles against stronger armies. He did that not only by reading the landscape, but also by lending his ears to the locals. In the end only, after so many lost Roman battle's, there is only one man who knows how to confront him: Scipio. It's a very interesting story.

The narrator is pretty good. Never boring. And there are some sound effects in there as well.

It is probably a good idea to learn the names and locations of some ancient places around the Mediterean before listening in a car: Carthago, the rivers Elbro and Rhone, Cannae, Trebia, Lake Trasimeno, Capua and such.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Dale
  • Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • 12-20-10

Impressive

I'm am amateur historian rediscovering classic history. Recognizing that I didn't know much more about Hannibal than the trek across the Alps, I sought out a book about him. This book is more than just a bare-bones review of Hannibal. The author tries to recreate the times and makes some educated suppositions about what life must have been like to fill in some details. These are intermixed with known facts and the story reads almost like a novel. I liked it and the reader is pretty good also. Recommended.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful