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Publisher's Summary

Malkiel Rosenbaum agrees begrudgingly to revisit the events of his father’s wartime experiences in Romania fighting the Nazis and, as a result, discovers another side to the stories, and a truth his own generation is in danger of forgetting.

©1992 Elie Wiesel (P)2011 Recorded Books, LLC

Critic Reviews

"A book of shattering force that offers a message of urgency to a world under the spell of trivia and the tyranny of amnesia." (Chicago Tribune Book World)

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Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Loved it, love it. Always will.

I first read this book near the time of its first publication. I loved it then and it hasn't lost its appeal. I feel in love with it again.

Elie Wiesel is a gifted story telling. His use of the written word and its place within structure and punctuation is like nothing I've ever read before.

As a Jew I find his words and wisdom to be indelibly imprinted on my heart and my wish is that as my children read his words that their hearts will also feel and see the truth in Elie Wiesel's books.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Memory as a character/plot

In preparing for teaching about dementia, I found this book fascinating in its exploration of all the quandaries of losing one's memory. Mr Wisel explores what it means to be human in the face of suffering and how memory defines. Very intriguing but the plot does lag at times. More philosophical than an active storyline.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful