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Ep. 5: 500 Names (100:1 The Crack Legacy)

Length: 24 mins
Categories: Radio & TV, Documentaries
4.5 out of 5 stars (9 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

[Contains explicit content] Decades ago, you sent hundreds of people to prison. And to this day, you know a lot of those sentences weren’t fair. How do you make things right? As a federal judge in the mid-90s, Nancy Gertner’s hands were tied by laws that forced her to come down severely against drug offenses – especially when crack cocaine was involved. We often think of judges as all-powerful in their courts. But in this episode, we look at how anti-crack laws forced judges to consider cold sentencing formulas, instead of human beings. Today, Gertner is finding ways to undo some of that damage.
©2016 Audible Originals, LLC (P)2016 Audible Originals, LLC

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Profile Image for Baphomafyew
  • Baphomafyew
  • 01-23-19

'Bastards of the Reagan Era'

Do you think it's fair for a minor possession charge to lead to life in prison for an 18 year old?

Christopher Johnson's investigative journalism is lively and engaging, and involves a strong amount of both research and personal accounts. Johnson tracks the destruction wrought not only by the 'crack epidemic' itself but by the draconian policies brought into place to supposedly deal with the scourge. The War On Drugs is portrayed as a failed project, cynically designed to make heroes of politicians with zero thought for the actual lives that would be impacted-- generations of (largely) African American men imprisoned for life.

I massively enjoyed the production, the narration, the interviews and the well-shaped argument. I found it extremely compelling, and look forward to Johnson's next project.

Further reading/listening: Michelle Alexander's study 'The New Jim Crow', Kendrick Lamar's album 'Section.80', Killer Mike's track 'R.E.A.G.A.N' and Dwayne Reginald Betts' poetry collection 'Bastards of the Reagan Era'.

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Profile Image for Mr. A. J. H. Jackson
  • Mr. A. J. H. Jackson
  • 08-11-18

B.L.M. Propaganda - 1 star as I couldn't give a 0.

B.L.M. Propaganda - no wonder it's free - don't waste your time - only gave 1 star as i couldn't give it a zero.