• Summary

  • The world of computer programming is vast in scope. There are literally thousands of topics to cover and no one person could ever reach them all. One of the goals of the Coding Blocks podcast is to introduce a number of these topics to the audience so they can learn during their commute or while cutting the grass. We will cover topics such as best programming practices, design patterns, coding for performance, object oriented coding, database design and implementation, tips, tricks and a whole lot of other things. You'll be exposed to broad areas of information as well as deep dives into the guts of a programming language. While Microsoft.NET is the development platform we're using, most topics discussed are relevant in any number of Object Oriented programming languages. We are all web and database programmers and will be providing useful information on a full spectrum of technologies and are open to any suggestions anyone might have for a topic. So please join us, subscribe, and invite your computer programming friends to come along for the ride.
    Coding Blocks 2019
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Episodes
  • Should You Speak at a Conference?

    Oct 11 2021
    We discuss the pros and cons of speaking at conferences and similar events, while Joe makes a verbal typo, Michael has turned over a new leaf, and Allen didn’t actually click the link. The full show notes for this episode are available at https://www.codingblocks.net/episode169. Sponsors Datadog – Sign up today for a free 14 day trial and get a free Datadog t-shirt after creating your first dashboard. Survey Says How likely are you to give a presentation? Take the survey at: https://www.codingblocks.net/episode169. News The Kinesis Gaming Freestyle Edge RGB Split Mechanical Keyboard might be the current favorite. Thank you to everyone that left a review! iTunes: dahol1337, Pesri How long does it take to get the Moonlander? (ZSA.io)Is the Kinesis Gaming Freestyle the current favorite? (Amazon)Atlanta Code Camp was fantastic, see you again next year! (atlantacodecamp.com) What kind of speaking are we talking about? ConferencesMeetupsDoes YouTube/Twitch count as tech presentations? There are some similarities! Streaming has the engagement, but generally isn’t as rehearsed. Published videos are closer to the format but you have to make some assumptions about your audience and can get creative with the editing. Why do people speak? Can help you build an audienceEstablish credibility Check out Azure Steve! Promotional opportunitiesNetworkingFree travel/conferencesGreat way to learn somethingBecome a better communicatorIs it fun? Who speaks at conferences? People speak at conferences for different reasonsCouple different archetypes of speakers: Sponsored: the speakers are on the job, promoting their company and productsPractitioners: Talks from people in the trenches, usually more technical and focused on specific results or challengesIdea people: People who have a strong belief in something that is controversial, may have an axe to grind or an idea that’s percolating into a productProfessionals: Some companies encourage speakers to bolster the company reputation, promotions and job descriptions might require this How do you put together a talk? How do you pick a talk?Know who is selecting talks, go niche for larger conferences if you don’t have large credentials/backingSometimes conferences will encourage “tracks” certain themes for topicsWhat are some talks you like? What do they do differently?Do you aim for something you know, or want to know?How do you write your talks?How do you practice for a talk?Differences between digital and physical presentations?How long does it take you? Where can you find places to speak? Is this the right question? What does this tell you about your motivation?Meet new people who share your interests through online and in-person events. (Meetup)Find your next tech conference (Confs.Tech)Google for events in your area! Final Questions Is it worth the time and anxiety?What do you want out of talks?What are some alternatives? BloggingVideosOpen SourceParticipating in communities Resources Is Speaking At A Conference Really Worth Your Time? (Cleverism.com)We’re 93% certain that Burke Holland gave a great talk about a dishwasher and Vue.js. (Twitter)Monitor you Netlify sites with Datadog (Datadog)Netlify (docs.datadoghq.com)Risk Astley – Never Gonna Give You Up (Official Music Video) (YouTube)Simple Minds – Don’t You (Forget About Me) (YouTube)Foo Fighters With Rick Astley – Never Gonna Give You Up – London O2 Arena 19 September 2017 (YouTube) Tip of the Week Next Meeting is a free app for macOS that keeps a status message up in the top right of your toolbar so you know when your next meeting is. It does other stuff too, like making it easier to join meetings and see your day’s events but … the status is enough to warrant the install. Thanks MadVikingGod! (Mac App Store)How do I disable “link preview” in iOS safari? (Stack Exchange)Here is your new favorite YouTube channel, Rick Beato is a music professional who makes great videos about the music you love, focusing on what makes the songs and artists special. (YouTube)Hot is a free app for macOS that shows you the temperate of your MacBook Pro … and the percentage of CPU you’re limited to because of the heat! Laptop feels slow? Maybe it’s too hot! (GitHub, XS-Labs)What is the meaning of $? in a shell script? (Stack Exchange)Did you know…You can install brew on Linux? That’s right, the popular macOS packaging software is available on your favorite distro. (docs.brew.sh, brew.sh)
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    2 hrs and 17 mins
  • Transactions in Distributed Systems

    Sep 27 2021
    Joe goes full shock jock, but only for a moment. Allen loses the "Most Tips In A Single Episode: 2021" award, and Michael didn't get the the invite notification in this week's episode. The full show notes for this episode are available at https://www.codingblocks.net/episode168. Sponsors Datadog – Sign up today for a free 14 day trial and get a free Datadog t-shirt after creating your first dashboard.Shortcut - Project management has never been easier. Check out how Shortcut (formerly known as Clubhouse) is project management without all the management. Survey Says Well...no survey this week, but this is where it would be! News This book has a whole chapter on transactions in distributed systems Thank you to everyone that left a review! "Podchaser: alexi*********, Nicholas G Larsen, Kubernutties,iTunes: Kidboyadde, Metalgeeksteve, cametumbling, jstef16, Fr1ekAudible: Anonymous (we are like your mother - go clean your room and learn Docker) Atlanta Code Camp is right around the corner on October 9th. Stop by the CB booth and say hi! (AtlantaCodeCamp.com) Maintaining data consistency Each service should have its own data storeWhat about transactions? microservices.io suggests the saga pattern (website)A sequence of local transactions must occur Order service saves to its data store, then sends a message that it is doneCustomer service attempts to save to its data store…if it succeeds, the transaction is done. If it fails, it sends a message stating so, and then the Order service would need to run another update to undo the previous action Sound complicated? It is…a bit, you can't rely on a standard 2 Phase Commit at the database level to ensure an atomic transactionWays to achieve this - choreography or orchestration Choreography Saga - The Order Service receives the POST /orders request and creates an Order in a PENDING state - It then emits an Order Created event - The Customer Service’s event handler attempts to reserve credit - It then emits an event indicating the outcome - The OrderService’s event handler either approves or rejects the Order Each service's local transaction sends a domain event that triggers another service's local transactionTo sum things up, each service knows where to listen for work it should do, and it knows where to publishes the results of it's work. It's up to the designers of the system to set things up such that the right things happenedWhat's good about this approach? "The code I wrote sux. The code I'm writing is cool. The code I'm going to write rocks!" Thanks for the paraphrase Mike! Orchestration Saga - The Order Service receives the POST /orders request and creates the Create Order saga orchestrator - The saga orchestrator creates an Order in the PENDING state - It then sends a Reserve Credit command to the Customer Service - The Customer Service attempts to reserve credit - It then sends back a reply message indicating the outcome - The saga orchestrator either approves or rejects the Order There is an orchestrator object that tells each service what transaction to runThe difference between Orchestration and Choreography is that the orchestration approach has a "brain" - an object that centralizes the logic and can make more advanced changesThese patterns allow you to maintain data consistency across multiple servicesThe programming is quite a bit more complicated - you have to write rollback / undo transactions - can't rely on ACID types of transactions we've come to rely on in databasesOther issues to understand The service must update the local transaction AND publish the message / eventThe client that initiates the saga (asynchronously) needs to be able to determine the outcome The service sends back a response when the saga completesThe service sends back a response when the order id is created and then polls for the status of the overall sagaThe service sends back a response when the order id is created and then submits an event via a webhook or similar when the saga completes When would you use Orchestration vs Choreography for transactions across Microservices?Friend of the show @swyx works for Temporal, a company that does microservice orchestration as a service, https://temporal.io/ Tips for writing Great Microservices Fantastic article on how to keep microservices loosely coupled https://www.capitalone.com/tech/software-engineering/how-to-avoid-loose-coupled-microservices/ Mentions using separate data storage / dbs per service Can't hide implementation from other services if they can see what's happening behind the scenes - leads to tight coupling Share as little code as possible Tempting to share things like customer objects, but doing so tightly couples the various microservices Better to nearly duplicate those objects in a NON-shared way - that way the services can change independently Avoid synchronous communication where possible This means relying on message brokers, polling, callbacks...
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    1 hr and 15 mins
  • Docker Licensing, Career and Coding Questions

    Sep 13 2021
    Some things just require discussion, such as Docker’s new licensing, while Joe is full of it, Allen *WILL* fault them, and Michael goes on the record. The full show notes for this episode are available at https://www.codingblocks.net/episode167. Sponsors Datadog – Sign up today for a free 14 day trial and get a free Datadog t-shirt after creating your first dashboard.Shortcut – Project management has never been easier. Check out how Shortcut (formerly known as Clubhouse) is project management without all the management. Survey Says How do you get prefer to get on the network? Take the survey at: https://www.codingblocks.net/episode167. News Thank you to everyone that left a review! iTunes: Badri RaviAudible: Dysrhythmic, Brent Atlanta Code Camp is right around the corner on October 9th. Stop by the CB booth and say hi! (AtlantaCodeCamp.com) Docker Announcement Docker recently announced big changes to the licensing terms and pricing for their product subscriptions. These changes would mean some companies having to pay a lot more to continue using Docker like they do today. So…what will will happen? Will Docker start raking in the dough or will companies abandon Docker? Resources Docker is Updating and Extending Our Product Subscriptions (Docker)Minkube documentation (Thanks MadVikingGod! From the Tips n’ Tools channel in Slack.)Open Container Initiative, an open governance structure for the purpose of creating open industry standards around container formats and runtimes. (opencontainers.org)Podman, a daemonless container engine for developing, managing, and running OCI containers. (podman.io)Getting Started with K9s (YouTube) How valuable is education? How do you decide when it’s time to go back to school or get a certification? What are the determining factors for making those decisions? Full-Stack Road Map What’s on your roadmap? We found a full-stack roadmap on dev.to and it’s got some interesting differences from other roadmaps we’ve seen or the roadmaps we’ve made. What are those differences? Resources Full Stack Developer’s Roadmap (dev.to) Bonus Tip: You can find the top dev.to articles for certain time periods like: https://dev.to/top/year. Works for week, month, and day, too. Where does your business logic go? Business logic should be in a service, not in a model … or should it? What’s the right way to do this? Is there a right way? Resources How accurate is “Business logic should be in a service, not in a model”? (Stack Exchange)AnemicDomainModel (MartinFowler.com) Are the M1/M1X chips a good idea for devs? Last year’s MacBook Pros introduced new M1 processors based on a RISC architecture. Now Apple is rolling out the rest of the line. What does this mean for devs? Is there a chance you will regret purchasing one of these laptops? Resources Apple Silicon M1: A Developer’s Perspective (steipete.com) Tip of the Week Hit . (i.e. the period key) in GitHub to bring up an online VS Code editor while you are logged in. Thanks Morten Olsrud! (blog.yogeshchavan.dev) Shoutout to Coder, cloud-powered development environments that feel local. (coder.com) The podcast that puts together the the “perfect album” for the topic du jour: The Perfect Album Side Podcast (iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts) Bon Jovi – Livin’ On A Prayer / Wanted Dead Or Alive (Los Angeles 1989) (YouTube) Docker’s system prune command now includes a filter option to easily get rid of older docker resources. (docs.docker.com) Example: docker system prune --filter="until=72h" The GitHub CLI makes it easy to create PR by autofilling information, as well as pushing your branch to origin: Example: gh pr create --fill (cli.github.com) Apache jclouds is an open-source multi-cloud toolkit that abstracts the details of your cloud provider away so you can focus on your code and still support multiple providers. (jclouds.apache.org)
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    2 hrs and 1 min

Featured Article: The Best Audiobooks and Podcasts for Programmers


If you’re looking for the best audiobooks and podcasts about programming, you might be a programmer looking for resources and new perspectives to expand your knowledge. Or maybe you’re a newcomer still wondering if it's even possible to learn how to program from a book. Whether you’re brand new to programming or you’ve been fluent in Python, Java, C#, and the like for years, there are tons of great audio resources available to help you hone your skills.

What listeners say about Coding Blocks

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

outstanding work, thank you Allen, Michael and JZ!

I have been enjoying this podcast for about 6 months now. I stumbled across them when they were going through devops handbook. they have been entertaining and informative in every episode.

The format is consistent and engaging with breaks for jokes and surveys. You can tell that they have been friends for a long time and while a bit nerdy, it is not really a nerd podcast. its like sitting around and listening in on an intelligent but relatable conversation.

The tip (tips for allen) of the week and resources they talk about and link to are indispensable to someone like me. I am working into the Dev field from manufacturing so all the tools and resources have been much appreciated.

I even lurk in the slack channel for the extra content they and the community provide there.

This is really the only way I am able to give back and I can't believe I am the first to review the podcast on Audible! Thank you; Allen, Outlaw, and JZ for the time and effort on the podcast, show notes and slack!

-devops.rob

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The coworkers I wish I had

I rarely leave reviews, but this is an awesome podcast for all software developers. I work for a very small company, and there's only one other developer here to collaborate with. In a rapidly changing industry, it's difficult to stay up on the latest trends, development methods, books, languages, etc. Listening to Allen, Outlaw and JZ during evening walks have helped me greatly in keeping knowledge up-to-date and figuring out which learning rabbit hole to go down next. Thanks guys!

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I love this podcast!

Allen, Joe and Michael are obviously very good at what they do, and they introduce various technologies that you might not have time (or the infrastructure) at work to properly experiment with. Like Docker.. and kubernetes (I swear I'll get into it soon - They're like my mom reminding me to clean the apartment every week, I know it's a good idea but meeehhh).

For one thing they recommended me the Phoenix Project, which, if you haven't already, you should read.

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AMAZING for dev at any stage

I'm a junior developer and I love these guys for learning and broadening my perspective, as well as book recommendations. They inspired me to start using docker and that was a huge help (I avoided python virtual env with docker and that alone is worth the hours I've listened to)

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My favorite programming podcast

I've listened to quite a few podcasts to pass the time while I am working or on a long drive, and I can say this one hands down has the best late night DJ voices of all the programming podcasts out there! Sure, it's both informative while also making me laugh, but we all know the most important factor is how good the DJ voices are so I'm here to tell you they are 11/10!

<3 Dysrhythmic

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Fun and Informative

This is a great podcast to listen to no matter your level of experience in the field thanks to the wide variety of topics covered. They also do an amazing job on creating show notes with relevant links and resources and a summary.

The best part, however, are the late night DJ voices!

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First Podcast I Ever Subscribed to!

This is the first time I actually started listing to PodCasts although I've been a developer for over 9 years! From the first episode, I learned some life and career-changing practices, Would recommend anytime!

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What a wonderful podcast (amazing job you guys!)

I have been listening to this podcast since day 1
And I've got to say it is hands down the best Code-Related podcast out there,
The content is passed with such fluidity in a conversational, "watercooler" manner, that is keeping you engaged.

It is such a fun and interesting way to start your day, learning, laughing, surveying, tipping of the week-ing :-)

I consider Allen, Michael and Joe to be my coworkers that I wish I had,
and this show is our talk-shop coffee time. (only I can only listen, but I feel like my voice is heard because of that back and forth they are dishing out)

Keep up the good work!

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You're gonna stick to this one

I stumbled upon the guys last November or December I think, when The Cynical Developer went on a break of undefined length and suddenly my weekly fix of general programmer talk disappeared.
Boy, was I lucky! What I found in Coding Blocks was not a mere replacement or substitute. The CB shows are entertaining, funny, and super informative at the same time. It quickly became one of my staples, I listen every week since then. I would go back and listen to old ones too, but I lack the time at thr moment.

Well done guys, and keep it up!

P. s. I confirm, lots of polish names have w in them. I'm Hungarian, but that's close enough to say, I believe :)

P.p.s. I usually listen on google podcasts, but I guess I just had to add mine to the "names longer that 3 characters" list :P

-András

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Excellent

Great podcast. I love the topics and stories. I love to listen to this podcast while work. Listening allows you to learn the life of developer, good practices, and skills. I love this podcast.