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Climatopolis

How Our Cities Will Thrive in the Hotter Future
Narrated by: William Dufris
Length: 6 hrs and 37 mins
Categories: History, 21st Century
3.5 out of 5 stars (13 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

We have released the genie from the bottle: climate change is coming, and there's no stopping it. The question, according to Matthew Kahn, is not how were going to avoid a hotter future but how were going to adapt to it.

In Climatopolis, Kahn, one of the worlds foremost experts on the economics of the environment, argues that cities and regions will adapt to rising temperatures over time, slowly transforming our everyday lives as we change our behaviors and our surroundings. Taking the reader on a tour of the world's cities from New York to Beijing to Mumbai - Kahn's clear-eyed, engaging, and optimistic message presents a positive yet realistic picture of what our urban future will look like.

©2010 Matthew E. Khan (P)2010 Audible, Inc.

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  • Prize Booker
  • 06-01-17

Some interesting opinions but lacks balance

Would you try another book written by Matthew E. Kahn or narrated by William Dufris?

The book takes an glimpse into how cities might adapt to potential climate change. However it makes a complete assumption that this is actually happening and dwells too much on people movement and not enough on technological advances.