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Publisher's Summary

A tall ship is trapped on a sandbar in 1885, broadsided by heavy seas and doomed to destruction on a lonely Brazilian Beach. Thus begins an incredible sea odyssey by a North American sea captain, his wife, and two sons. To return his family to safety, Captain Joshua Slocum builds a new boat out of the wreckage of the old. With his family, he sails along the perilous South American coast, crosses the Caribbean Sea, and navigates up the United States coast to Washington, D.C.

The Voyage of the Liberdade is a first-person telling of this exciting adventure in it's first audiobook recording. This audiobook also includes two bonus true adventures written by Captain Slocum: "Rescue of Some Gilbert Islanders" and "The Voyage of the Destroyer from New York to Brazil", his perilous piloting of a very old, badly leaking worn out battleship, sold by the United States to the Brazilian Navy. These three adventures were experienced and written by Captain Slocum before he wrote the most famous sailing adventures ever written, Sailing Alone around the World.

Public Domain (P)2012 Listen2Read LLC

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  • John S.
  • Seattle, WA United States
  • 11-16-14

Glad it was cheap!

Good that this was a short book (non-fiction "novella" as it were), as I never got used to the author's rather verbose, corny style. I suppose it may well be the way Victorian sea captains spoke, and I assumed that the narrator faithfully reproduced that effect, but the result just wasn't for me; had this been a full-length work, I doubt I'd have finished it. The final hour (25%) consists of a second-hand tale from the South Seas written by Slocum, based on reports he says he "translated" with the aid of a Polynesian Bible as his Rosetta Stone; I gave that part a pass.

I had my doubts about "Sailing Alone Around the World", which now goes into the Highly Unlikely category.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful