Regular price: $29.95

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Considered to be the first autobiography of its kind, The Confessions is two distinct books published seven years apart and covers the first 53 years of the author's life. The autobiographies of the time delved primarily into the individual's religious life, but Jean-Jacques Rousseau wanted to do something different. Instead of focusing on faith, he wrote about his thoughts and misadventures.

Publication of The Confessions scandalized 18th-century Europe due to its graphic nature and the author's shameful adventures. If the modern listener is looking for a grand tour of Europe of the 18th century, Jean-Jacques Rousseau is the perfect tour guide. The author takes the listener on a journey of this long-ago era with firsthand accounts that are outrageous and amusing.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau was a Genevan philosopher, writer, and composer of the 18th century and was instrumental across Europe in modern educational and political thought.

Public Domain (P)2017 A.R.N. Publications

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.8 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    10
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    9
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    8
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • David
  • 07-15-17

Jean Jacques Rousseau

Where does The Confessions rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

To be allowed an intimate insight into the life, thoughts and struggles of a person who lived in the 1700's is a privilege and a gift. JJR gives this gift to the world.

How could the performance have been better?

I prefer the tone and voice adopted by this narrator when compared to other narrators of the same book, however the performance would be enhanced if the narrator had taken more trouble with pronunciation of french names and places.

Any additional comments?

Superb book