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Publisher's Summary

It's become an article of faith that American entrepreneurship is in trouble. The problems are many: lack of capital, too few entrepreneurial immigrants, excessive regulation, an aging population, slowing population growth, and rising student debt. But while experts across the country debate the causes and propose solutions, Scott Shane explains that the data just do not fit. Dismantling each of the most widely accepted theories in turn, he persuasively demonstrates that - while an evolving market is changing the nature of most startups - entrepreneurship is actually alive and well. 

Shane reveals how the number of incorporated startups is rising, fewer startups are failing, and the number of businesses backed by investors is increasing. The overall picture is positive. Exhaustively researched and compellingly told, this book will be discussed for years to come.

©2018 Scott A. Shane (P)2018 Tantor

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  • Philo
  • San Diego, CA, United States
  • 07-03-18

What's shaping up, today and tomorrow

I'm teaching business law to people looking forward to a full career lifetime. It is pretty critical to me, to add value for them, to get this kind of info. The author sticks close to the data and it has a ring of truth from that. I started in law practice in offices where of course the key professional hired secretarial and research support staff. In my own practice, I was of the first generation to learn computer use as a professional (the older generation spurned keyboard skills), and to not hire humans in that process. I learned to code, and had my computer as my support staff. This shift is well tracked here, with updates (useful to me, as I have been merely teaching for awhile). Anyone similarly planning the setup of a business may be interested.
The economy continues to produce gainful work, and new businesses. Big-picture doom scenarios are not here, for now. However, per this author, these new businesses are of particular configurations, often corporate in form with minimal staffing.The author offers reasons for this, that ring true to my experience.
The subject can be dry, but for me it is worthwhile focusing here. And I may do another startup in the future.