All the Winters After

A Novel
Narrated by: George Newbern
Length: 10 hrs and 4 mins
4 out of 5 stars (1,431 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The Snow Child meets The Shipping News in this atmospheric novel about a man who returns to his Alaskan hometown after 20 years away.

Kachemak Winkel never intended to come back to his hometown of Caboose, Alaska, where his family died in a plane crash 20 years earlier. When he finally musters the courage to return and face his painful memories, he's surprised to find a mysterious young woman living in his abandoned house.

Hiding from a past that gives her nightmares and withdrawn from a world she can't find her place in, Nadia certainly never expected one of the owners to come knocking on the door 10 years after she turned the little abandoned cabin into her home. Set in the majestic yet dangerous natural beauty of Alaska, All the Winters After is ultimately a love story about two lost, broken souls who discover the healing powers of forgiveness and family.

©2016 Seré Prince Halverson (P)2015 Brilliance Audio, all rights reserved.

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What listeners say about All the Winters After

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Ambivalent

I have ambivalent feelings about the book. The descriptions of the people and scenery were exquisitely drawn. Their emotions and struggles were beautifully portrayed and yet…

Central to the story are the Old Believers whose heritage is Russian Orthodox. They are much like the Mennonites or Amash in their strict beliefs and ways of doing things. This side story added a great deal to the novel.

The book dragged. It was one I could easily put down and it was very predictable. I felt my efforts to finish the book were betrayed by the open ending.

47 people found this helpful

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The Old Old Story

An excellent version of the old old story of loving and letting go. The unique setting was refreshing but the story could have been told in any setting. Finding and losing love is a universal emotion with which everyone can identify. It is encouraging that the storyteller illustrates, with heartbreaking realness, the love of LBGT persons and the societal struggles they have had to face for too long. Love is within everyone and along with its euphoria, it seemingly always brings trials and tribulations. Halverson has done a masterful job of presenting that case.

51 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Research, research, research

Three chapters in and my skin is crawling. The narrator nails the pronunciation of "Kachemak" correctly, but fails miserably with "Kenai" and "Redoubt." Maybe this is nitpicky, but it takes a few minutes to confirm the correct pronunciation of place names. The narrator sounds like my GPS.

50 people found this helpful

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I loved this story

I normally fall asleep to audiobooks, but this one kept me up a couple nights. Beautifully written, well told. Want a spin-off.

22 people found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars

Sweet, but slow, and politically correct.

Halverson is a good writer, and put down a great setup at the beginning, that got me hooked, but then the pace became slow and ponderous, and I liked the story less and less and the book dragged on.

This is intended to be a very sweet story, and has plenty of poignant moments, but in my opinion, this confection is spoiled sour by it's infantilization of the main characters. Ketch, Nadia, and Snag are all chronological adults, each living out a teenage coming of age kind of plot, the gist of which is (spoiler alert) along the lines of the adolescent follow your dreams cliche. This kind of childish self, self, self preoccupation is repugnant in adults, and it's hard to care very much about these overaged kids having their mid-life crises. The most admirable, empathetic characters, the adults in this book died decades before and are only referred to from that great distance. This Halverson can turn a phrase, and there were some nuggets in the story too, as it went along. It wasn't all bad, so I laboriously stuck it out.

This book could well be made into a movie, because it was written to check all the boxes for Hollywood: Exotic locale; -check. The only visibly Christian people portrayed as oppressive, backward heavies; --check. Man working a steady job cast as dull, stifled, not living; check. NO signs of anybody who really needs to work to earn a living; check. Main female character (pretty much all the female characters are) a Mary Sue who doesn't need a man for anything; --check. A coming out of the closet homosexual thread written into the middle of it; --check. Portraying the greatest good in life putting yourself first; and leaving other people and things by the wayside when and where they become inconvenient to your self, self, self; -check, check, check.

After plowing through to the end, my takeaway from this book is that life is too short to waste time listening to books like this one; when there is a practically infinite supply of great reading; --if you can separate the wheat from the chaff. As such, my recommendation is to pass on this one up as chaff, and take a chance on finding something really good. My favorite read of 2018 for example: A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles, something superbly written and all grown up. Roughly the opposite of "All the Winters After", it's about an actual grown man facing adversity, and forging a great and beautiful life living UNselfishly.

2 people found this helpful

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Loved this "feel-good" story!

In a promo, this novel was compared to The Snow Child (which was only "okay"), and I almost did not get it as a result. Remembering Audible's return policy, I took a chance, and I am so glad I did. What a great novel! It is a relationship story that takes place in rural Alaska, and has equal appeal to men and women. The main character is Kache, a man returning to his homestead after being away for 20 years. He left when the rest of his immediate family was killed in a plane crash. Now, he meets a strange woman of Russian descent, living alone in his isolated house. This is a novel of tragedy, and a great feel-good story too. It is a multi-generational family saga. I cared so much about all the characters, and the reader was SO GOOD. This novel transported me to a new world, and I did not want it to end.

8 people found this helpful

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Great reader, poetic writing

I thought the audiobook's reader was fantastic! He read both male and female characters in a believable voice. The book itself strikes me as literary in style. I'm not a fan of literary writing, which is why I only gave it three stars. Fans of literary and poetic styles would probably like this book a lot more than I did.

19 people found this helpful

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narrator makes the book work

great fan of George Newbern narrations (man called ove). The book was well done except sometimes the characters were a little too competent.

16 people found this helpful

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Predictable

I don't know what I expected when I bought this one, and it's not that it was badly written, but yet I felt disappointed. I actually said to myself at the end...eh. Honestly for me the story was very predictable. I did enjoy the narration and the historical parts. Other than that well, just predictable. That's my 2 cents worth

1 person found this helpful

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You Can Go Home Again


This novel is beautifully written and paints an impressive mental canvas of the Alaskan wilderness for the reader.

A man experiences his coming of age at the age of 38 after losing his family in a plane crash 20 years prior. "Ketch" travels home to Alaska to face his demons as well as a young Russian woman has staked an emotional claim on his family's homestead. Past family secrets unfold throughout the novel.

The author provides female characters with strong, significant, and respectable roles. However, it's not chick lit.

The narrator got better as the book progressed, and by the end, gave a commendable performance. The ending is very well done. A worthy read that is worth your time.

5 people found this helpful