Showing results by author "Ramon Pacheco Pardo"

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    • A Macat Analysis of Hans J. Morgenthau's Politics Among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace

    • By: Ramon Pacheco Pardo
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 4
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 3
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 3

    Morgenthau's classic text, published in 1948, not only introduced the concept of political realism but also established it as the dominant approach in international relations and the guiding philosophy of US foreign policy during the Cold War.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • An Analysis of Robert O. Keohane's After Hegemony

    • By: Ramon Pacheco Pardo
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      5 out of 5 stars 1

    The ideas set out by American international relations expert Robert O. Keohane in 1984's After Hegemony have had a huge impact on policy debates over the last three decades, both in political circles and in academia. Hegemony means the social, cultural, ideological or economic influence of one dominant group. Contemplating a post-Cold War world half a decade before the Berlin Wall fell, Keohane asks if international cooperation can survive in the absence of a single superpower.

    Regular price: $6.95

    • A Macat Analysis of Sun Tzu's The Art of War

    • By: Ramon Pacheco Pardo
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      2.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      2.5 out of 5 stars 2
    • Story
      2.5 out of 5 stars 2

    Written more than 2,000 years ago, this earliest surviving work on how to wage war successfully - and above all, rationally - argues that winning requires careful advance planning, better sources of information than your opponent, and a strategy that's flexible enough to adapt to changing conditions. Sun Tzu concludes that in the end, a decision not to take military action can be every bit as sensible and effective as being able to triumph on the battlefield.

    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • An analysis not a synopsis

    • By Patrick Miesen on 12-28-17

    Regular price: $6.95