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Publisher's Summary

Make your gifted life meaningful.

Overcome your unique challenges. The challenges smart and creative people encounter - from scientific researchers and genius award winners to best-selling novelists, Broadway actors, high-powered attorneys, and academics - often include anxiety, overthinking, mania, sadness, and despair. In Why Smart People Hurt, natural psychology specialist and creativity coach Dr. Eric Maisel draws on his many years of work with the best and the brightest to pinpoint these often devastating challenges and offer solutions based on the groundbreaking principles and practices of natural psychology.

Find meaningful success. Do you understand what meaning is, what it isn’t, and how to create it? Do you know how to organize your day around meaning investments and meaning opportunities? Are you still searching for meaning after all these years? Many smart people struggle with reaching for or maintaining success because, after all of the work they put into attaining it, it still seems meaningless. In Why Smart People Hurt, Dr. Maisel will teach you how to stop searching for meaning and create it for yourself.

Learn from a truly thought-provoking personal growth book. In Why Smart People Hurt, you will find:

  • Evidence that you are not alone in your struggles with living in a world that wasn't built for you or your intelligence
  • Logic- and creativity-based strategies to cope with having a brain that goes into overdrive at the drop of a hat
  • Questions that will help you create your own personal road map to a calm and meaningful life

Consumers of true, natural self-help books for gifted people struggling with life, anxiety, and depression, like Living with IntensityMisdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults, and Your Rainforest Mind, will learn how to create meaning in their lives with Why Smart People Hurt by Dr. Eric Maisel.

©2013 Eric Maisel (P)2020 Vibrance Press

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Stunningly Unintelligent

"Why Smart People Hurt" simply is an incredibly poorly written book. Firstly I got through an hour of this garbage and the word "smartness" is repeated around 10 times. Seriously, for a book with this title the writer couldn't demonstrate a greater vocabulary? Intellect, intelligence, native cognitive ability or capacity none of these words come to mind?...I would consider the irony funny if it weren't so aggravating. That's just the verbiage, the tone of the books is cloyingly ingratiating. I found myself increasingly irritated with this patronizing and evasive material but it tracks with other "self help" genre books. Writers like this are the snake oil salesmen who comes to town, spouts a bunch of trumped up nonsense and gets out before it's fully realized how fraudulent and meaningless their rhetoric is.

The book goes on to not define "smartness" in any particular way. Wouldn't that be a natural place to start, to define some parameters however broad they might be? My suspicion is the author avoids this potentially murky territory in part because he simple doesn't have the insight to speak with any authority. Secondly avoiding defining "smartness" is simply a better sales tactic, why potentially alienate readers by describing boundaries on this concept? I WOULD recommend for those curious about this territory "The Drama of the Gifted Child" it's more of an academic essay but light years beyond this book.

3 people found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars

disappointed

feels like cognitive behavioral therapy for the chronically bored, burnt out average person who was taught that television is a panacea. People, and capitalism are the thing that most often make smart people bored and depressed. We already know to make meaning. This is why gifted programming allows more freedom. Meaning Making is a natural impulse. Then society kills our souls.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 04-28-21

An overall good book

I find it disappointing that the authors needed to discredit creationism based on humans being imperfec, it simply wasn't necessary and put a damper on the book for me which I mostly enjoyed. the argument wasn't necessary to the overall message in the book.