adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $21.35

Buy for $21.35

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

The national best seller

One of Entertainment Weekly's and SheReads' books to read after The Handmaid's Tale 

"[An] electrifying debut.” (O, The Oprah Magazine

“The real-life parallels will make you shiver.” (Cosmopolitan

Set in a United States in which half the population has been silenced, Vox is the harrowing, unforgettable story of what one woman will do to protect herself and her daughter.

On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than 100 words per day, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial. This can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her.

Soon women are not permitted to hold jobs. Girls are not taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke 16,000 words a day, but now women have only 100 to make themselves heard.

For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice. 

This is just the beginning...not the end. 

One of Good Morning America's “Best Books to Bring to the Beach This Summer”

One of PopSugar, Refinery29, Entertainment Weekly, Bustle, Real Simple, i09, and Amazon's Best Books to Read in August 2018.

©2018 Christina Dalcher (P)2018 Penguin Audio

Critic Reviews

"Narrator Julia Whelan brings this realistic, thought-provoking debut to life with heart.... A frighteningly believable story that ends with hope." (AudioFile)

Editorial Review

100 Words…is the length of this paragraph!

Vox has a great hook: what if women could speak only 100 words each day? But men and boys aren’t limited *at all*? Well, at the start of the novel, our heroine, Dr. Jean McClellan, is pretty tired from holding in all her thoughts and feelings…and resentful of her own beloved husband and sons. In the tradition of The Handmaid’s Tale, Vox makes dystopia feel contemporary and plausible. Although the novel is a little long, and I disagree with some of Jean’s choices, I enjoyed the performance by Julia Whelan, one of my favorite narrators. She makes every word count! —Christina H., Audible Editor

What listeners say about Vox

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    704
  • 4 Stars
    376
  • 3 Stars
    193
  • 2 Stars
    66
  • 1 Stars
    35
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    889
  • 4 Stars
    262
  • 3 Stars
    77
  • 2 Stars
    15
  • 1 Stars
    5
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    617
  • 4 Stars
    319
  • 3 Stars
    193
  • 2 Stars
    62
  • 1 Stars
    53

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Please ignore the negative reviews.

Most of the negative reviews are from Christians who don’t like what they hear. If the religion of the bad people in this book had been, say, Muslim, then there would be five stars all over the place!

The book is interesting. It leaves you with more questions than answers, however. On a small scale, it is an interesting social experiment. Is it possible in America? Probably not. But it also rings true in a lot of senses.

At the end of the day, Vox probably deserves 3.5-4 stars, but I chose to give it the full five stars to offset the obvious poo-pooing of all the offended Christians who don’t think this book is appropriate. Religion, ALL religion, has dark sides. Survivors of the LDS cults in Utah and Arizona would agree, I think.

If you decide to read Vox, just buckle up and enjoy the ride! If nothing else, it will make you think. What is the true end that religious zealots desire in this country? I have a feeling that more than a few would enjoy the idea of women being seen and not heard.

42 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

The Handmaid’s Tale But about our words

Vox was recommended to me by a teacher friend. She told me if I like Handmaid’s Tale, I’d love this. What she described; a dystopia where women are not used for sex or child rearing, but as nearly mute slaves to a patriarchal government... I was in for the whole ride.
The one downside to this book is that it keeps you angry the whole time, which is great when facing injustices and trying to punch Nazis, not great when you’re trying to do mundane tasks like order coffee or clean the house.

Be careful of the ending. It’s... it’s something we have all seen in books done to men, so I like the trope switch... but it still feels like lazy writing, even if it is done pointedly so.

Wonderful book, will be recommending to every woman and man I can talk to.

14 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Great concept but the end felt rushed

I really enjoyed the concept of this story but the dialogue was unnatural and the end felt like the author just got in a hurry to wrap things up; I don’t want to give it away but- I felt the author should have spent more time with it. Too rushed- so rushed that some things just left me going, “but wait- why did they do that and how did they get from here to there ??”

18 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Disappointed

Gender stereotypes
Cultural stereotypes
Ethnic stereotypes
I wanted to like this book, but I found it too predictable filled with cliches.

34 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

A successful book for all the wrong reasons

Moral of the story: Women should blame religious conservatives for their problems.

Before I start ranting about everything wrong with this book, I just want to take a moment to mention it’s 1 redeeming quality: it’s a quick read.

And now...

While Dread Nation was cashing in on social relevance, and Children of Blood and Bone was riding the success of Black Panther (although the hype surrounding it kind of hid that fact). Vox one-ups them by doing both at the same time. Capitalizing on feminism, and unashamedly riding the success of The Handmaid’s Tale.

When I explained the premise of Vox to a coworker of mine, even she said: “That’s the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard.” Yep, a girl said that. Her exact words.

Women are only allowed to speak 100 words per day, and exceeding that limit results in an electric shock from a mechanical wristband keeping track of said words. ...and that’s about as far as the story concept went. The author knew she wanted to write a story about women being oppressed, which is fine. But seriously? THAT’S what you came up with. This book would’ve been better off going with some Planet of the Apes style nonsense, where the protagonist finds herself in a new land where women aren’t just oppressed, but are full on enslaved. If anything it would’ve been more exciting.

And yet somehow, the basic premise of the story isn’t even its biggest flaw.

The world building in this is unbelievable, and not in the good way. I mean it’s literally NOT believable. Even ignoring the absurdity that our society would allow such a drastic change in civil rights given our current real world views, it’s world building at its absolute worst. And for those of you who are saying “but it’s not our world, it’s a dystopian society,” keep reading.

The first half of this book is littered with pop culture references, from FIOS to the iPhone, from South Park to Pokémon Go. It even throws in real life historical events such as the Nazis and Rwanda. Having all of these real world inclusions only breaks down the illusion of a dystopian society. I think it’s fair to say that if women’s speech we’re limited to such an extreme, we wouldn’t have a lot of the things we enjoy today and history would’ve played out a lot differently.

It’s almost like, instead of actually taking the time to world build, the author just decided to take our real world and give it a new reality. Except her new reality doesn’t make sense within the world she’s trying to fit it into. (I think that made sense).

Also, a side-note that was just kind of bugging me: If the church, and/or a religious faction, were able to amass so much power as to be able to remove the constitutional rights of women, I’m pretty sure, of all things, South Park probably wouldn’t be around anymore.

Given the timeframe this book is coming out, I don’t doubt it will be a success. But I do believe it will be for the wrong reasons.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

It’s okay.

Narrator is great. Story line had potential. A shame that the main character lacks the moral to stay faithful to her husband, her excuse being that her husband is too weak to stand up to the dystopian anti woman type government. Turns out he actually was part of the resistance. So he is conveniently killed and all four kids of her kids don’t even seem to mourn their own father before just accepting the affair partner. This lady makes me sick. But yeah, cool idea for a book. Sooo much more I could say about the unrealistic costs of infidelity and lack of morals but not worth it

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Extreme hysterical liberal propaganda

Quick read, love to listen to anything Julia Whelan narrates. The story however, while quick to get through, reminds me of The Handmaiden's Tale. An extremely liberal hysterically written propaganda piece against anything conservative or religious.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Handmaid wanna be

Story is unrealistic. Limiting women to 100 words per day is pointless. How would a women who is to keep house and raise children function without words? A lot of science in this book which does not seem possible. At least with the handmaid tale the treatment of the citizens of Gilead seems plausible

36 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Blatant Discrimination Published as a Bad Novel

This youtube book review says everything that you need to know. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JweDoVBitQ&t=91s (beware: spoilers, crude language)

This what I call the "Vox Hate Manifesto Mathematical Equation of 2018"
VOX = Bad Characters + Erratic Plot Developments + Religious Discrimination + Stereotyping + Ignorance + Prejudice x HATE

I was so excited for the premise of this book, but having reached the other side, this review will serve as my very serious WARNING. First off, this story is NOT set in the future. It is set today. And the evil villains that are enslaving and electrocuting women are….. Christians.... today's Christians.... like ALL of them… even the ones you know. But especially the ones that live in “a place called the Bible Belt.” No matter what sect. No matter what group. No matter what sex or background or creed. No matter who their parents are and how they were raised. That means nothing. If they believe in Christ, they are completely consumed and bent on their one great passion—to overthrow the American government and enslave women, silencing them and torturing them until women despair of their very lives. I’m sure you can see how I kept thinking, “IS THIS A JOKE?!” I'm familiar with all the different groups in this religion, I know plenty of people in this religion. HOW SHOCKING. To be so lumped together in this random, horrifying, despicable way. I am so sorry to Christians everywhere for this hateful, ignorant book. The idea that all members of one religious group are all the same, and, on top of that, that they are all horrible and disgusting and hateful, is GROSS. The idea that any and all Christians that we know in work or school and have in our lives, that THOSE people will be the ones that destroy the world, that THOSE people are harboring one great and terrible secret of ABSOLUTELY HATING WOMEN, is terrible.

So this book’s message wasn’t actually the creepiest experience about reading it. I mean, it kind of makes sense that someone who discriminates would write a novel that depicts it—that’s her right! Free speech! I LOVE FREE SPEECH. Get it out there. Show your hate and prejudice so that all the rest of us can RUN LIKE CHEETAH in the opposite direction. What is so alarming is the unsettling number of people that have read this book, and think that this premise is ok. Me after reading the negative reviews so far = ????? !!!!!! Lots of questions. Lots of exclamations. The negative reviewers that did a good job of pointing out unbelievable characters and shabby writing.... they are perfectly ok with the glaring religious stereotyping problems of this novel?? The bad reviews don’t even mention it! It’s like they are saying, “This book stereotypes Christians, so it’s ok to say they’re are all horrifyingly terrible and hateful!” The Funny thing is that, the Christians are NOT the only group in this novel that are stereotyped. In this story, only the die-hard feminists are the ones that can see this coming apocalypse of civil liberty. Everyone else is completely DUMB. Everyone else is completely on board with the Christians taking over. If you're not an angry feminist in a march you are a WORTHLESS MINION. Flip that and you get yet another unnerving part of this novel. Just like the author/narrator discriminates against modern day Christians, she ALSO does this with feminists. The feminists are painted all the same color. THEY HATE CHRISTIANS. THEY HATE CONSERVATIVES. THEY HATE REPUBLICANS. And only through their hate and their battles against the Christians can their war be won. What about all the Christian feminists?! What about them?! I have spoken to many Christians who speak about how Christ was a feminist... passionately, in fact. But no, these types of people do not exist in the “today” of this novel.

Like I said before, at first, I thought I must have stumbled into a bad joke. Then I thought this must be something like “A Modest Proposal” or Voltaire's "Candide," where the author was actually making fun of the ludicrous things that she was saying. At that point, I got really excited because I thought that the author was being clever... We would soon learn that we have an unreliable narrator... Of course, right?! We would soon discover that actually THIS narrator's point of view is EXACTLY how things like this dystopian scenario happen, in which one group believes that every person belonging to a different group shares all the same negative agendas and values and traits as a small few: just label them, hate them, judge them across the board without wisdom or tolerance, and YES, CIVIL LIBERTY AND THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT WILL END. This author surely would have a point other than showing hate of an entire religious group, and I would soon see it!!! But, NOPE. We instead learn that the narrator WAS DEAD SERIOUS. CHRISTIANS SUCK. This new world order, where all women are forced to wear bracelets that electrocute and shock them if they speak too much, all came about because all the groups of today’s Christians--everyone from Presbyterians to Lutherans to Catholic-- they all agree on one thing: THEY MUST oppress women, all women, relentlessly, crushingly, with electric shock, all the time, everyday, it's their favorite.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Not a bad book...

I didn't struggle to listen to it. It did flow, but honestly I didn't really care about the characters because the writer didn't make you care about them one way or another. The story was there and it wasn't bad, but it could have been so much better had things been fleshed out a little more.

2 people found this helpful