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Publisher's Summary

An inclusive, research-based guide to working the 12 steps: a trauma-informed approach for clinicians, sponsors, and those in recovery.

Step 1: You admit that you're powerless over your addiction. Now what? 

Twelve-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) have helped countless people on the path to recovery. But many still feel that 12-step programs aren't for them: that the spiritual emphasis is too narrow, the modality too old-school, the setting too triggering, or the space too exclusive. Some struggle with an addict label that can eclipse the histories, traumas, and experiences that feed into addiction, or dismisses the effects of adverse experiences like trauma in the first place. Advances in addiction medicine, trauma, neuropsychiatry, social theory, and overall strides in inclusivity need to be integrated into modern-day 12-step programs to reflect the latest research and what it means to live with an addiction today. 

Dr. Jamie Marich, an addiction and trauma clinician in recovery herself, builds necessary bridges between the 12-step's core foundations and up-to-date developments in trauma-informed care. Foregrounding the intersections of addiction, trauma, identity, and systems of oppression, Marich's approach treats the whole person - not just the addiction - to foster healing, transformation, and growth. 

Written for clinicians, therapists, sponsors, and those in recovery, Marich provides an extensive toolkit of trauma-informed skills that: 

  • Explains how trauma impacts addiction, recovery, and relapse 
  • Celebrates communities who may feel excluded from the program, like atheists, agnostics, and LGBTQ+ folks 
  • Welcomes outside help from the fields of trauma, dissociation, mindfulness, and addiction research 
  • Explains the differences between being trauma-informed and trauma-sensitive; and 
  • Discusses spiritual abuse as a legitimate form of trauma that can profoundly impede spirituality-based approaches to healing.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2020 Jamie Marich (P)2020 North Atlantic Books

What listeners say about Trauma and the 12 Steps, Revised and Expanded

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Do Not Buy This Book

Don't let the title fool you. This is not a book on how to work thru trauma using the 12 steps . Is nothing but negative criticism about the AA fellowship. Im disappointed a highly educated person wrote this book full of criticism instead of attempting to use their professional and personal to help people recovery.

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Trauma and 12 Step Recovery

I found this book to be very informative regarding Trauma and working the 12 step Programs. Resources offered and related items in appendix are awesome! I really enjoyed this book! I have recently joined a 12 step Program. I have had some ups and downs. This book really helped me to understand some of my problems with the program.

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Very helpful healing within 12 Step structure

12 Step programs are everywhere, and have been helpful for stopping active addiction, and when done as thoroughly as possible, CAN provide benefit in healing the "causes & conditions" that drive addiction in the average addict/alcoholic.

From my experience (similar to what the authors shared), the "problem" those of us with trauma history have is in the rigidness & intolerance of SOME members of the fellowship (not 12 Step programs) that insist they know it all & feel qualified to judge others who's experiences are different than their own. They insight that "you just need to pray about it" and it will disappear.

You need to feel it, to heal it. Avoiding the unpleasant feelings with spiritual bypassing platitudes is not "healing" (though it certainly DOES have some value in certain conditions).

This book is quite valuable for helping me deal with my own Complex PTSD, it's validating.

A plug for Dr Dansiger. He's a leading teacher & practioner for EMDR, so if you have interest in EMDR, research his works.

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  • Big Floppa
  • 05-30-21

garbage

1 one of worst books I've ever listened 2! couldn't even finish it. A personnel opinion is all it is.