The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War

Narrated by: Bill Wallace
Length: 12 hrs and 13 mins
Categories: History, Military
4.5 out of 5 stars (249 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Get ready for a rousing rebel yell as best-selling author H. W. Crocker III charges through bunkers and battlefields in The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War. Crocker busts myths and shatters stereotypes as he profiles eminent and colorful military generals, revealing little-known truths, like why Robert E. Lee had a higher regard for African-Americans than Lincoln did. Crocker culminates his tome in the most politically incorrect chapter of all: "What If the South Had Won." This is the "P.I." Guide that every Civil War buff and Southern partisan will want on their bookshelf, in their classroom, and under their Christmas tree.
©2008 H. W. Crocker III (P)2008 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

The American Civil War Made Simple

Contrary to the title's suggestion, there's very little in this title than I would rank as Politically Incorrect. I would however recommend this audiobook unreservedly to anyone with even a passing interest in America's Civil War. The book is well written, divided neatly between battles and personalities and well read.

32 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Do Two Wrongs Make a Right?

American history suffers from two great stains: Slavery and the Civil War/War Between the States/War of Southern Succession/War of Northern Aggression. What name you choose reflects your conclusion about the war. Perhaps the Europeans have it best. They call it the "American War."

Most war history is not only the victor's history, but it is also colored by the result of the war, which can obscure the causes of the war. This is the author's main argument: that the war to preserve the Union has been recast as the war to end slavery, thus making the war a noble cause. The war indeed did end slavery, but its causes and the sentiments of the participants were far more complex. The exploration of this complexity is the politically incorrect aim of the book: That while slavery was of course immoral, so too was this war -- perhaps even more so. And without this war, slavery may have ended in a manner far better for everyone, including the slaves.

In the victor's history the loser is vilified. Among these villains we have a large proportion of people who were highly regarded prior to the war, and even after the war, including the grandsons of many of the country's founding fathers. What motivated these noble countrymen? What motivated the Union leaders? The answers do not correspond with a politically correct noble war to end slavery. The answers point to a stain in American history as dark as the stain of slavery.

While it can be said that this book is about the war from the Confederate point of view, it's really about the war from a point of view that considers many moral issues other than just slavery. If you are open to exploring this complexity, you will enjoy this book.

25 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Civil War from the Southern Point of View

A balanced look back at the thoughts and feelings of the South before, during and after the Civil War. Nice review of the strengths and weaknesses of the Generals for both sides.

12 people found this helpful

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Recommend this book only as another point of view.

This guy wants you to share his opinion. His bias is obvious. Still, it’s good to get all sides. I wouldn’t not recommend this book. It is history. Just from a southern sympathizer that is in love with Robert E Lee and is luke warm, at best, to the rest of the confederate generals. Lee could do no wrong. Even when Lee admitted he did wrong. He says some other stuff that raised my eyebrows. But yeah.

The performance was great.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Mind altering

This book re-wired my brain. The author's open sympathy for the confederate cause is backed by rational arguments and historic facts that the public schools in the north didn't impart to me. Crocker is fair to the Northern heros, too, giving credit where it's due.

The narration is excellent, couldn't turn it off.

23 people found this helpful

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Total disappointment.

Horribly disappointing. Author is clearly pro confederate, makes informational mistakes, interjects his own opinion as fact and is most definitely a idolizer of Robert E. Lee. Anyone listening to this book should also listen to The Myth of the Lost Cause by an author named Bonekemper.

10 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

More than slightly biased

Overall, this book gives a very good picture of the Civil War. That being said, this work is terminally slanted to the southern cause. The 'Books Yankess Dont Want You to Read' segments are entertaining even if purposefully provocative. Calling Gone With the Wind 'historically accurate' is absolute lunacy. You would be hard pressed to find a more inaccurate and idealized book on life in the antebellum south. Lee is practically worshiped as semi-divine and the author sounds like he is slobbering over Lee rather than simply pointing out his virtues. This book could have been much better if it was not pushing the lost cause narrative from beginning to end.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent Narration and Content

I was not a Civil War enthusiast until I listened to the Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War. I had predicated my purchase of the PIG material on prior purchases and deduced that it would be a good investment. I was so impressed with the narrative on the history of the Civil War from this audio book that I also purchased some of the author's recommended readings. Well done!

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Accurate history lesson for all Americans

This book is no doubt the most accurate and eye opening accounting of the war between the states that I have seen. All Americans, or anyone for that matter, should listen to this and understand what really happened during those years, and since. I would recommend this to anyone that wants to know the truth about the Civil War and how the South is today.

16 people found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Yawn

Nothing to see here folks. For anyone who has a knowledge of the Civil War beyond what the teacher told you in high school, there are no revelations in this book. The book is of course slanted in favor of the South and is full of opinionated writing that is weakly backed by questionable facts. One of the issues I have with the book is that it still doesn't take responsibility for the South firing the first shot. Had the South waited and gained support from Britain and France first, history might be very different. An outright falsehood in the book is the statement that Lincoln owned slaves. Lincoln's family left Kentucky when he was a child and he never again lived in a slave state. Lincoln did hire both black and white servants, and may have come into possession of an indentured servant (someone working to repay a debt, not the same as a slave). There is no definitive proof that this person was indentured.

Overall this book is a waste of time. If you want to learn about the war, read McPherson and Foote.

22 people found this helpful

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  • Rogtan
  • 05-02-18

Certainly Not PC

A partisan trot around the ACW. Revealing and annoying by turns. Difficult not to listen to every damned word.