The Me, Me, Me Epidemic

A Step-by-Step Guide to Raising Capable, Grateful Kids in an Over-Entitled World
Narrated by: Margaret Strom
Length: 12 hrs and 50 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (70 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Whenever Amy McCready mentions the "entitlement epidemic" to a group of parents, she is inevitably met with eye rolls, nodding heads, and loaded comments about affected children. It seems everywhere one looks, there are preschoolers who only behave in the grocery store for a treat, narcissistic teenagers posting selfies across all forms of social media, and adult children living off their parents.

Parenting expert Amy McCready reveals in this book that the solution is to help kids develop healthy attitudes in life. By setting up limits with consequences and training them in responsible behavior and decision making, parents can rid their homes of the entitlement epidemic and raise confident, resilient, and successful children. Whether parents are starting from scratch with a young toddler or navigating the teen years, they will find in this book proven strategies to effectively quell entitled attitudes in their children.

©2015 Amy McCready (P)2016 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"This user-friendly guide is overflowing with practical, creative, and thoughtful strategies." ( Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Longer than it needs to be, condescending narration, but did have some good tidbits

The entire first chapter talks about spoiled behavior to no avail. We get it and that’s why we’re reading the book! By the 3rd chapter you still have the author trying to convince you and say things like “with tools you’ll learn later”. And in the forth chapter she’s still talking about what privileged behavior looks like.

The whole book is 11 hours! I’ve listened to global peace books that long! In reality this whole book can be summed up in a blog post. There are good pointers, don’t get me wrong, but the other 9 1/2 is just wasted material. Personally I really dislike authors like this because it’s like they’re trying to prove themselves or show they know more than they do.

Lastly someone mentioned that it seemed like the author didn’t like kids. I think it’s actually the narration. The narrator speaks in a condescending and demeaning tone the whole time making it seems like a “us” against “kids” book when there are some good pointers.

Personally I got much better advise listening to Choice Theory, which isn’t even aimed at raising kids, than I got out of this book. But I did learn from this book that my kids not spoiled (thank goodness) but I can give them a little more to do and also how to hold ground when they negotiate (because my kids are experts at it). However at times I do let them “win” so to speak because they present their case so reasonably and calmly that I think they should be commended for that. I don’t see it as me against them but rather as a mentorship. Therefore it’s my job to guide but also let down my guard.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Great book with many tools

This book has really good ideas for un-entitling your children. I can tell already that these ideas are working. I’m going to go back through and reread the print edition (which I got from the library) so I don’t have to buy on audible and a paper copy. If you do the audio book be prepped to take notes otherwise there is no way you’ll remember it all, hence why I’m back for the print edition.

1 person found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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every parent needs to read this book

I found this book incredibly insightful, I need to do everything this book says. Now if I can just get my wife to read it to.

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • BW
  • 08-06-19

No thanks.

I'm pretty certain this author does not like children or it could be the tone of the narrator. Either way, no thank you.

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Great book. Easy to follow.

This book has some great tips. easy to follow. I find myself going back to it to review things over and over. It has made some changes on my parenting skills.

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extremely useful and enlightening

definitely put to use a lot of the thoughts and suggestions given. hope to see improvement

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Waste of money

I was curious about this book but after listening to the first half i want to get my money back. Knowing that behavior is a way of communication there is no way for me to agree with this author. All she says is ignore unwanted behavior which will eliminate the behavior. That is not true. There are so many other great parenting books.