• The Magician's Land

  • A Novel
  • By: Lev Grossman
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 16 hrs and 27 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (11,181 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The stunning conclusion to the New York Times best-selling Magicians trilogy.

Quentin Coldwater has been cast out of Fillory, the secret magical land of his childhood dreams. With nothing left to lose he returns to where his story began, the Brakebills Preparatory College of Magic. But he can't hide from his past, and it's not long before it comes looking for him.

Along with Plum, a brilliant young undergraduate with a dark secret of her own, Quentin sets out on a crooked path through a magical demimonde of grey magic and desperate characters. But all roads lead back to Fillory, and his new life takes him to old haunts, like Antarctica and the Netherlands, and buried secrets, and old friends he thought were lost forever. He uncovers the key to a sorcerous masterwork, a spell that could create magical utopia, a new Fillory - but casting it will set in motion a chain of events that will bring Earth and Fillory crashing together. To save them he will have to risk sacrificing everything.

The Magician's Land is an intricate thriller, a fantastical epic and an epic of love and redemption that brings the Magicians trilogy to a magnificent climax, confirming it as one of the great achievements in modern fantasy. It's the story of a boy becoming a man, an apprentice becoming a master, and a broken land finally becoming whole.

©2014 Lev Grossman (P)2014 Penguin Audio

Critic Reviews

“Richly imagined and continually surprising.... The strongest book in Grossman’s series. It not only offers a satisfying conclusion to Quentin Coldwater’s quests, earthly and otherwise, but also considers complex questions about identity and selfhood as profound as they are entertaining.... The Magician’s Land, more than any other book in the trilogy, wrestles with the question of humanity.... This is a gifted writer, and his gifts are at their apex in The Magician’s Land.” (Edan Lepucki, The New York Times Book Review)

“The strength of the trilogy lies...in the characters, whose inner lives and frailties Grossman renders with care and empathy.... Quentin[’s]...magical journey is deeply human.” (The New Yorker)

“Grossman makes it clear in the deepening complexity and widening scope of each volume that he understands the pleasures and perils of stories and believing in them.... The Magician's Land triumphantly answers the essential questions at the heart of the series, about whether magic belongs to childhood alone, whether reality trumps fantasy, even whether we have the power to shape our own lives in an indifferent universe.” (Gwenda Bond, The Los Angeles Times)

What listeners say about The Magician's Land

Average Customer Ratings
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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

A beautiful ending to a great masterpiece

I have read all three books, and they all enthralled me.
I didn't know what this book would entail, and I was a bit skeptic it would be as good as the other books (moreover, I was very skeptic about the ending being good).

But once I started reading, the magic did come through, I was beautiful to see how mature the characters become.

And the ending... I loved it! it was perfect, unpredictable and magical.
I really hope to keep hearing from Lev G in the future...

17 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Forward, Backward, Around, and Then... Bullseye!!

For just an hour or so, at the beginning, disappointment started to creep in as I listened. I thought, oh well, you can't crank out a 5 start every single time. But I was wrong. Every word written in the first few chapters of this third book of the series is necessary to set up the story to come. The novel moves back and forth through time and worlds, but does so easily and without reader confusion... even if the chapters don't start with a date, etc. The people and events of the two worlds face each other, interact, and then collide into a great story. There are new characters we knew by name in the first two novels that we get to know in depth. Narration is very good. This series needs to be read in order.

15 people found this helpful

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Engrossed in Grossman

Any additional comments?

Abracadabra! The Magicians, as a garden (go with it), was patchy, brambles mixed with incredible blossoms (great book), while the The Magician King erupted into a wild English garden. The second book was better than the first, but you cannot view the books that way, one apart from the other, and the two-book combination is about as good as anything that fantasy literature has to offer, but The Magician’s Land surpasses the second book, and makes a whole that is as beautiful a magical piece as is The Lord of the Rings, or all of Narnia. It might not be fair to say that this is Harry Potter for adults, but this trilogy is certainly not for children (although you wish it could be, but 17 years of age is about as young adult as possible). No spoilers herein, but I gotta tell ya, some impossible things happen, things you wanted to happen since the first book closed, and these are not literary cheats (well, you know, maybe three or four, but all expertly dealt, and you will not mind the appearance of those purloined aces from up the sleeve). Grossman has become a master of backstory, and some of his best writing is in the storytelling (breaking the modern tv-era-demand of “show-don’t tell”, and it is wonderful storytelling, including journal entries, characters sharing stories, secrets whispered, I loved it from beginning to end, way to go, Grossy). Magical (duh). And thank goodness for Mark Bramhall’s continued elegant reading (I still think he sounds like a slightly tipsy David Hyde Pierce), a rich voice that fairly sounds a siren’s call, with apt Brooklyn accents, and hoity-toity faux British nose-lifters, and a rich musical constant that rivals Scott Lee, although the Australian twang still needs a tweak or two, but it is a very minor complaint; Bramhall makes Grossman pop, so to speak). The Magician’s Land is a sure thing, a masterful accomplishment, and if you do not end up rereading the three books at least three times in the next three years, it just could trigger a magical apocalypse, so you are cautioned. Lev Grossman is the dude. Art et Amour Toujours

10 people found this helpful

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THIS is how to finish a trilogy

I showed up for "The Magician's Land" ready to have my 30-something worldview shaken around once more by the horrifying genius teenagers from the previous novels, only to find them all grown up (at least, those who survived) and behaving much more sensibly, and sensitively, than I expected.

Quentin finally gets some perspective! He has become the likeable adult that often results from a troubled and disaffected youth. It's incredibly refreshing, and so is the first part of the story: Quentin, working as a magical gun-for-hire, gets involved in an ill-advised heist for some shady characters. It's funny, a little sad, and insanely dangerous, and it sucked me into the story at once.

In the end, everything ties back to Brakebills and Fillory - and this is where this book really starts to stand out as something exceptional. Previously, we experienced everything through the lens of the main characters' (often tiresome) teenaged jaded world-weariness. Now, Quentin has had time to reflect on the world, magic, and life in general, and he's more optimistic, thoughtful, and creative.

There are some really beautiful themes woven into this story - about the way people experience stories as children, teenagers, and adults; about growing up, and of course love, redemption, all that stuff. But it's also thrilling and exciting and totally unpredictable. It's huge, I loved it, and I wholeheartedly recommend it!

8 people found this helpful

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Guess I've outgrown Narnia after all...

Although not usually a fan of the fantasy genre, a large part of the appeal of this trilogy for me has been its inspiration from the Narnia chronicles of C.S.Lewis which captivated me as a child. How would those stories play out if the characters were allowed to mature and develop in the "real world"?

I loved the first book of the trilogy, the second a little less so and the third (this one) not so much. At his best, Lev Grossman recreates in my heart the almost painful yearning I had as a child to enter the fantastical world of of Narnia (Fillory, in Grossman's rendering of that world). Descriptions of the imaginary world and its inhabitants are lush and evocative and sure to appeal to lovers of the genre. For me, however, the mystery of the first novel in the series was missing and I found it increasingly hard to care about what happened to the characters in a world so disconnected from our own.

It makes me a little sad--I wish I could have gotten more into the spirit and summoned back to life the sense of wonder I had as a child. The stories have it right for most of us--once you grow up it is almost impossible to fully return to those lands of your dreams, whether it be Narnia, Fillory or Neverland...

8 people found this helpful

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Oh no not again!

Would you listen to The Magician's Land again? Why?

I will listen to " The magician's land " agian. I have this trilogy on cd and in my Audible library . Mark Bramhall does a great job bringing this book to life.

What other book might you compare The Magician's Land to and why?

I have never read the Harry Potter books but have heard this series of books compared to them as the " adult version" of Harry Potter.

Which scene was your favorite?

This book moves fast, could easily been thirty hours long, I would love to have read the unedited version. I think one of my favorite scenes was Alice's meltdown and recovery.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

A two day listen on the road, great entertainment. Love the book and the series...worth a credit.

Any additional comments?

Great series but felt the last book was a quick wrap up. I wished it was longer, seemed to be rushed and left me wanting the story to continue. Nobody writes like Grossman, his style stands alone and Mark Bramhall's performance is perfectl.

7 people found this helpful

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The tv series is better than the books

I enjoyed the books but I like the SyFy series better. The characters have more personality in the television series and the story has a better plot.

6 people found this helpful

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Magical

Loved every word... I would love to go there. Maybe someday? I am so glad they all got their wish.

5 people found this helpful

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Perfect ending to a not so perfect story.

It is not who-at I expected. Finally the who-impy and who-inny Quentin steps up to the plate. Who-ich had me waiting for a long time. We finally see the Who-ite castle counter-part. We see who-en, who-ere and who-enever Alice is and who-at is Quentin's usefullness at who-ile last. If you hate how Stewie says Who-eat Thins this trilogy is 48 hours full of it by the narrator. But after the first 47 hours you get used to it. Just Warning You.

4 people found this helpful

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I enjoyed every quirky moment.

I know a lot of people where annoyed by the Pevensie/Potter references in this series. But I've gotta tell you, that was probably my favorite part of these books. I loved every quirky minute of the Brakebills Academy description. And really, if you haven't always wanted to travel to a magical kingdom full of sentient trees and talking animals, I'm not sure if we can be friends.

Another complaint was the seriously flawed characters. And really, everyone of them behaved pretty badly at some point. But I think Grossman did an awesome job describing what real people would do in the the strange setting of living in the "real" world while knowing there is a magic side to life. By the end of the series, everyone of them had shown enormous growth. And isn't that what life is really about?

All in all, I loved this series. And I would recommend it to anyone willing to read PG-13 books. If your offended by swearing and a few (rather tame) sex scenes, then this is not the series for you.

4 people found this helpful

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