Try our newest plan – access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks, and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Plus plan is $7.95 a month after 30 day trial. Upgrade or cancel anytime.
Buy for $39.95

Buy for $39.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

One of the foremost achievements in Western literature, Homer's Iliad tells the story of the darkest episode in the Trojan War. At its center is Achilles, the greatest warrior-champion of the Greeks, and his refusal to fight after being humiliated by his leader, Agamemnon. But when the Trojan Hector kills Achilles's close friend Patroclus, Achilles storms back into battle to take revenge - knowing full well that this will ensure his own early death.

This tragic series of events is interwoven with powerfully moving descriptions of the ebb and flow of battle, of the domestic world inside Troy's besieged city of Ilium, and of the conflicts between the gods on Olympus as they argue over the fate of mortals. The Iliad is a work of extraordinary pathos and profundity that concerns itself with issues as fundamental as the meaning of life and death. Even the heroic ethic itself - with its emphasis on pride, honor, prowess in battle, and submission to the inexorable will of the gods - is not left unquestioned. This version of The Iliad is the translation by Alexander Pope.

Public Domain (P)2010 Tantor

What listeners say about The Iliad

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    101
  • 4 Stars
    25
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    3
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    95
  • 4 Stars
    14
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    94
  • 4 Stars
    14
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

One Advantage of Not Knowing Classical Greek

Like playing a musical instrument or swimming the English Channel, it’s one of those things I just never got around to. I’m not proud of my ignorance, but I do appreciate the advantage it bestows: a reliance on translations, each, like the slight turn of a child's kaleidoscope, presenting a new perspective on the same basic shapes and colors. Compare Robert Fitzgerald:

Anger be now your song, immortal one,
Akhilleus’ anger, doomed and ruinous,
that caused the Akhaians loss on bitter loss
and crowded brave souls into the undergloom
leaving so many dead men—carrion
for dogs and birds; and the will of Zeus was done.

To Caroline Alexander:

Wrath--sing, goddess, of the ruinous wrath of Peleus' son Achilles,
that inflicted woes without number upon the Achaeans,
hurled forth to Hades many strong souls of warriors
and rendered their bodies prey for the dogs,
for all birds, and the will of Zeus was accomplished...

To Pope:

Achilles' wrath, to Greece the direful spring
Of woes unnumber'd, heavenly goddess, sing!
That wrath which hurl'd to Pluto's gloomy reign
The souls of mighty chiefs untimely slain;
Whose limbs unburied on the naked shore,
Devouring dogs and hungry vultures tore.
Since great Achilles and Atrides strove,
Such was the sovereign doom, and such the will of Jove!

“Undergloom” is a wonderful coinage. Alexander strives to bring us as close as possible to the sense and feel of the original Greek (I'll take her word for it). And calling Achille’s wrath the “direful spring” is spot-on; the only larger spring in this tale is the abduction (or seduction?) of Helen. The Georgian grandeur of Pope's version can be intoxicating.

But while there is much to enjoy here, I miss that poetic slight on hand, enjambment. Of course, heroic couplets are intended to stand out as couplets, and both on the page and in Michael Page’s reading, they do. Even where an idea overflows those tidy, 20-syllable compartments, he tends to put a full stop at every line. Understandable, since Pope constructs most of his lines out of main and subordinate clauses—thus giving each a natural stopping place. As much as I revel in rhyme and meter, this got to be a little too herky-jerky.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

An excellent audio book for an epic poem.

An excellent narration for an epic poem, translated by Alexander Pope, whose control over verse is unparalleled.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

The beauty of Pope's Iliad made audible.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Iliad?

It is not about memorable moments. It is about being swept along on the tide of Pope's words.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Pope's masterful verse translation comes to life

I find myself wishing that Michael Page also did Pope's Odyssey. This was such a fun 65 hours. Often I would rewind and relisten to the most beautiful parts.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Classic

I thoroughly enjoyed the reading from start to finish thanks to the excellent narration. The story itself is entrenched in philosophy to the point where I enjoyed pondering on the words when I wasn't listening. This first book is very long but the drama will keep you coming back. A true must listen! Can't wait to start part 2.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Narration became monotonous

This might be a product of the poetic rhythm, but I think the maturation lacked emotional variance across scenes and characters. However the narrator was very clear and easy to follow.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent Interpretation of a “Chewy” classic!

This narration of “The Iliad” makes the classic very easy to follow while most enjoyable as well. I’ve attempted to read this text numerous times trying different interpretations or “tellings” of this chewy most undesirable Goliath of a poem!???! This listen really laid it out well and held my attention from beginning to end! I now see why it is considered one of the greatest works ever written; furthermore, I agree with the assessment as well, Homer does rival Virgil easily and stands equal with Alighieri and Milton; coming from me that is huge because Milton is my favorite with Dante a hair thin second! Enjoy this epic and most instructive telling of “The Iliad” a most powerful and satisfying listen!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fantastic translation and performance

Words fail me. The poetry in English surpasses expectations and makes me wonder at its complex Greek construction!

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Lattimore’s translation beats this one!

The rhyming scheme make this tamarin very dull to listen to, often putting me to sleep. This translation also made it much harder to follow the storyline. I much prefer Lattimore’s translation, which is prose (not poetry) and yet still has the interesting cadence similar to Homer’s original Greek epic.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Names

They used the Roman names instead of the Greek names, otherwise it was pretty good.

.