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Publisher's Summary

"Inspired by his podcast of the same name, this combination memoir and informational text is narrated by its author with sincere emotional investment and subtle humor." (AudioFile Magazine)  

A moving portrait of depression, from the host of the podcast The Hilarious World of Depression

"This book is an excellent life raft for those of us who are so sure that we are alone in our struggles. You should read it." (Jenny Lawson)

"A funny, honest book about depression, and what you can do despite it." (Neil Gaiman) 

This program is read by the author, with original audio from the podcast. 

For years John Moe, critically acclaimed public radio personality and host of The Hilarious World of Depression podcast, struggled with depression; it plagued his family and claimed the life of his brother in 2007. As Moe came to terms with his own illness, he began to see similar patterns of behavior and coping mechanisms surfacing in conversations with others, including high-profile comedians who’d struggled with the disease. Moe saw that there was tremendous comfort and community in open dialogue about these shared experiences and that humor had a unique power. Thus was born the podcast The Hilarious World of Depression

Inspired by the immediate success of the podcast, Moe has written a remarkable investigation of the disease, part memoir of his own journey, part treasure trove of laugh-out-loud stories and insights drawn from years of interviews with some of the most brilliant minds facing similar challenges. Throughout the course of this powerful narrative, depression’s universal themes come to light, among them, struggles with identity, lack of understanding of the symptoms, the challenges of work-life, self-medicating, the fallout of the disease in the lives of our loved ones, the tragedy of suicide, and the hereditary aspects of the disease. 

The Hilarious World of Depression illuminates depression in an entirely fresh and inspiring way. 

This program features podcast interviews with Maria Bamford, Guy Branum, Neal Brennan, Dick Cavett, Margaret Cho, Ana Marie Cox, Whitney Cummings, Mike Drucker, Solomon Georgio, Chris Gethard, John Green, Gary Gulman, Hannah Hart, Jenny Jaffe, Jen Kirkman, Jenny Lawson, Aimee Mann, Rhett Miller, Reggie Osse, Kryssy Pease, Andy Richter, Peter Sagal, Scott Thompson, Paul F. Tompkins, Jeff Tweedy, Baron Vaughn, Wil Wheaton and Mara Wilson. 

A Macmillan Audio production from St. Martin's Press 

©2020 John Moe (P)2020 Macmillan Audio

What listeners say about The Hilarious World of Depression

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Funny and emotionally heavy: book title checks out

I've been a very loyal listener to THWoD since the first episode, so I was very happy to learn that John Moe would put himself in the guest's seat for once. I was not disappointed in the slightest. There were moments where I laughed, others when I cried, and an entire chapter that resulted in me Tweeting to John Moe letting him know I felt personally attacked which he promptly responded to. Hearing these stories in his own voice was meaningful, for as a THWoDball, hearing him read it is like hanging out with a friend. This isn't a self help book, but more of a self hope book.

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Okay but better suited to podcast format

Depression isn’t funny - it ruins lives; however, levity is certainly a viable strategy to deal with it. The irreverent title and the tone are fine. And the book provides some salient insight and entertainment, but it also contains sections that I would have edited or not included. The author’s rambling and stream-of-consciousness style works for the podcast but less so for the book. That said, my opinion may have been different had I not been a podcast listener.

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very good.

I have struggled most of my life with depression, Lotta therapy starting at 17 some meds. This book spoke to me. It was difficult for me in spots because of personal trauma but I highly recommend it.

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Life saving book for the NPR tolerant reader...

Warning: this book contains frank and explicit description of Moe's struggle with suicide and the tragic, honest and moving telling of the experience of his older brother's suicide. Jumping off from his podcast by the same name, the author humbly acknowledges his growing awareness of his own privilege as a white, male, college... need I go on,,, and continues to carry on in the NPR tradition that brought us This American Life with Ira Glass. If you are struggling with suicide, depression or other mood disorder please reach out. There is a great list of 7 hotlines that exist by Jami Harrison. If you love someone in danger, these hotlines can help you as well. But back to the book review. No matter what your story holds, you likely find enlightenment and comfort here this. Stay strong ~ Mare

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Great

This is the first book I have listen to. I always read. I recommend this book to everyone, saying I learned so much in spite of the fact that I have much training in mental illness. I loved John’s conversational tone and his ability to convey difficult things through humor. I wish more people knew of this book and that his show would’ve gone on and on and on.

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love his raw expression and vulnerability

As a long time fan of the podcast this was amazing for me - a touching and poignant semi autobiographical journey.

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Entertaining, but sad

If you are looking for the book to lift your spirits- this is not it. It’s a memoir of a difficult life, full of traumatic events, which led to lifelong depression.

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Loved it!

Great book, great narration and now I'm hooked on the podcast too :) Will likely check out John Moe's other works in the future.

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Made me feel less alone

As a chronic saddie currently suffering from a relapse of depression at the moment, I needed this book. I was already a fan of the podcast, and it was comforting to hear John’s voice again reminding me I’m not alone. While John’s story is very different from my own, the book touches on some universal truths about depression that resonated deeply with me.

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decent intro to life with depression

I'm glad that John had the courage to share his story, and that he's created a community with THWoD. I've listened to the podcast on and off for a few years. My enjoyment of the book would have improved if there was more of a focus on discussing specific symptoms of depression and its manifestations, vs constantly making the distinction that normal people will never understand what youre going through .