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Publisher's Summary

A young listeners edition of the New York Times best seller The Disappearing Spoon, chronicling the extraordinary stories behind one of the greatest scientific tools in existence: the periodic table.

Why did Gandhi hate iodine (I, 53)? How did radium (Ra, 88) nearly ruin Marie Curie's reputation? And why did tellurium (Te, 52) lead to the most bizarre gold rush in history?

The periodic table is a crowning scientific achievement, but it's also a treasure trove of adventure, greed, betrayal, and obsession. The fascinating tales in The Disappearing Spoon follow elements on the table as they play out their parts in human history, finance, mythology, conflict, the arts, medicine, and the lives of the (frequently) mad scientists who discovered them.

Adapted for a middle-grade audience, the young listeners edition of The Disappearing Spoon offers the material in a simple, easy-to-follow format. Students, teachers, and burgeoning science buffs will love learning about the history behind the chemistry.

©2010 Sam Kean (P)2018 Hachette Audio

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  • 09-25-18

Nice history stories but....

Nice history stories but a bit disjointed. The editors brief is a bit vague. I now know why. This collection of stories while interesting I don’t think could keep the interest of a teenager. It could barely hold mine.