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The Church History

Narrated by: John Lescault
Length: 13 hrs and 14 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (23 ratings)
Regular price: $24.47
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Publisher's Summary

Often called the "Father of Church History", Eusebius was the first to trace the rise of Christianity during its crucial first three centuries from Christ to Constantine. Our principal resource for earliest Chrisitianity, The Church History presents a panorama of apostles, church fathers, emperors, bishops, heroes, heretics, confessors, and martyrs.

This audiobook edition includes Paul L. Maier's clear and precise translation, historical commentary on each book in The Church History, and numerous maps, illustrations, and photographs. These features promise to liberate Eusebius from previous outdated and stilted works, creating a new standard primary resource for listeners interested in the early history of Christianity.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

Public Domain (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Good Overview of Early Church History

This is a very good history of the early Christian church which is difficult to obtain otherwise. There are some minor flaws in content which are clearly laid out since it was an early written history by an author that didn't use modern modes of history writing but the vast majority of it is balanced and fair and gives interesting details of early Christian saints and martyrs(of which some grisly details are also exposed.) The narration is excellent, clear, with good diction and just enough inflection to convey the import of some stories. This is well worth listening to.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Excellent, but hard to distinguish footnotes

It would have been very helpful if the footnotes had been voiced by a different narrator from the original text.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Gary
  • Las Cruces, NM, United States
  • 01-01-19

Superb footnotes add to brilliant history

The modern day commentary and footnotes enhance the incredibly pleasurable writing of Eusebius.

I always wonder why more modern day believers don’t explore the fundamental roots of their own modern day beliefs from some of the original foundational documents such as this book. I don’t think I’ve ever read an Early Medieval history book, or an Early Christian history book which did not quote extensively from Eusebius.

I know I now have to read Josephus because of Eusebius. Hoopla has an audio version of his book that I will borrow for free. Though, I would much prefer a version like this book that has explanatory footnotes and commentaries. The translator, Maier, had a fairly good discussion on Josephus’ mentions of Jesus and what scholars believe to be extrapolations or not, and the footnotes and commentary overall did not go wasted on me.

The only fault with this audible version is that I wasn’t always able to distinguish the footnote or commentary from Eusebius’ writings. I wish that the reader had been told to say ‘footnote’ and ‘end of footnote’ in the narration. But, that tells me how good of a writer Eusebius really was because his writing flows like a modern day conversation between friends.

To understand who we are today it sometimes requires understanding where we came from. Why is what we call the bible today the bible, or what does Jesus’ nature mean or what’s this about the Arian controversy, what’s all this about martyrs and why it is so important for the church’s history, and why are the Donatists so cool to understand (I’m going to give you a hint, it has something to do with the reformation and Martin Luther, but of course Eusebius and Augustine don’t know that), and how does the ‘catholic church’ (i.e., ‘catholic’ means ‘universal’ and the early ‘catholic church’ meant all are welcome) become a ‘Catholic Church’ (i.e. ‘universal’ means everywhere). Eusebius explains how the early orthodox Christians world thought about itself and allows one to anticipate the transition to Augustine who mostly defines the medieval Catholic world until Thomas Aquinas comes along in 1250. Eusebius always takes an orthodox (mostly from a Greek perspective) position, but all of these kinds of things lurk within the text and is incredibly well presented and are necessary for understanding where we are toda

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • ChangePro
  • 11-24-18

A second narrator helpful?

Whilst mellifluous, having a single narrator for both author and commentator can sometimes be confusing.
That said I, a lay person, have found this educational, accessible and inspiring.