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Temple Grandin: The Stories I Tell My Friends  By  cover art

Temple Grandin: The Stories I Tell My Friends

By: Anita Lesko,Dr. Temple Grandin
Narrated by: Jennifer Groberg
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Publisher's Summary

Temple Grandin is the most famous person with autism in the world. Whether you know her from the HBO movie Temple Grandin, her decades of work in the meat and cattle industry, or her unmatched contribution to the autism world, surely you know a thing or two about Temple. Well, prepare to meet a whole new side of her! Temple's close friend and author, Anita Lesko, conducts personal and unique interviews.

In this audiobook, witness the moments that made her laugh (and cry!), meet those closest to her, and even take a glimpse into her seventieth birthday party! Discover Temple's “big message” and her ideas about what makes the biggest difference for children with autism. Lesko has created a truly personal, unique look into the mind and life of Temple Grandin. This is a story you don't want to miss!

©2018 Anita Lesko (P)2018 Future Horizons

What listeners say about Temple Grandin: The Stories I Tell My Friends

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Read other books to read first

The author gives much deserved praise to Dr. Gradin., but does not provide enough substance.

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loved this book!

Jennifer Groberg is an amazing narrator, bringing this gem to life! Very insightful into a brilliant, hard working, since, positive, genuine autistic individual.

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An interesting look...

Into the private life of Temple Grandin. The stories contained within this title are heartwarming, often quite funny, or in the cases of some of Grandin's struggles, occasionally infuriating--it is difficult for women in academia as is, but was much worse a couple generations ago--now compound that with Autism. You can feel and empathize with Grandin's frustrations. Lesko does a fine job of retelling in interview style stories from the conversations she and Grandin have had. Be prepared, as noted, it is interview style rather than a continuous storyline. That being said, it makes it easy to jump in and out of the tales. My only complaint is that the narrator for this one was a bit too overly animated for my liking, though she did a fair job and this may be a characteristic other listeners will enjoy.

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  • Paula B.
  • 11-24-21

great staring point for Autism

The book it's self is well written, The author seems to have captured Temple very well. the reader is also very good.

my only issue, and it's something I feel strongly about....do not Force an Autistic person to funtion normally. (I have ASD)
getting kids out into the world is great, for the parent, and might work in some cases with the child, depending on what their autism is for THEM. every person with Autism is different, some thrive in the normal world, and some don't, I'm a mixed bag, but I'm happy. Temple says she requires medication to funtion...I learned to cope without any medical or other help, because where I live, there is no help, I was diagnosed at age 19, my schools labled me as a bad child, and said my mother was neurotic because, she knew there was something different about me. and no one would listen, and belive me she tried.
I got my diagnosis after walking into my doctors office, and saying, I'm weird and I want to know why, and I'm not leaving until you listen....I was 18, and for the most part, non verbal with people I didn't know. I played out side when I was young ,went shopping, but doing that...does not perpair you for the world. I didn't understand what was wrong with me...doctors didn't have a clue.
but knowing I had ASD, gave me something to work ok, first I wanted to find out what was ASD and what was me...so I researched everything I could find (Not much) I had some of the common traits, non verbal, no eye contact, panic attacks, high pain tolerance (I hated dentists so pulled out my own teeth) abnormal strength, sensory overload....the usual, but I also noticed I had my special traits...visual thinking, and information recall, I was creative, I loved animals and bonded with all types, I got on really well with the elderly and children but not the age groups in between. And the second anyone knew I had autism....kiss work good bye no one wanted me. so I did volunteer work with my local riding stable, in groups for the elderly. I challenged all of my autism traits, eye contact and spacial awareness...I joined a karate class, (I'm now a martial arts instructor) I would get nervous and jittery if I had to sit in boring places for a long time, so I learned to crochet (I'm excellent at it) I watched documentaries, I watch and read everything, schools had failed me, but I loved to learn. I recently found out thatch know more then 2nd year medical students who had never done a patient examination before. book learning is great, but it's too safe. I no longer have panic attacks, very very few meltdowns, I'm happy with my life and that's the most important thing...if there is something I don't want to do, or not in the mood to do, like go to a party(I hate parties) I say no. I stopped letting people treat me like an idiot...my favourite quip, I have Autism I know what I'm doing and how to do it, if I want help I'll ask. I'm a sweet kind person 99.9 of the time I'll help anyone if I'm able. and just remember, that kid hooked on video games, will probably grow up programming a new computer system and will have better understanding of the would as it becomes more focused on the internet and apps, I can't work a pc to save my live, but my 6 year old nephew can...I nurture that...because having knowledge of computer, and gaming software will be more of a job prospect.
never force your Autie to do something they have no interest in, your doing more harm then good, they will figure life out in their own time, I was maybe 25 before I started to learn how to Adult...but I will always be a big kid at heart and that make me fun to be around...I hate people who wear suites all the time....they are just one of the huge croud, I always stand out...and I'm never boring.

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  • barpe1
  • 08-18-19

Appalling writing style.

In over 50 years of reading all kinds of literature I don't think I have detested a book so much. Temple Grandin is a great visionary and inspiring person but this book trivialises her achievements principally because of the writing style. It is written with the breathtaking, hyped manner of a celebrity gossip magazine.

The narration is no better with exaggerated expression and faked laughter. Temple Grandin deserves better.