• Racing the Clock

  • Running Across a Lifetime
  • By: Bernd Heinrich
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 6 hrs and 48 mins
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (41 ratings)

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Racing the Clock  By  cover art

Racing the Clock

By: Bernd Heinrich
Narrated by: Fred Sanders
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Publisher's Summary

An award-winning, much-loved biologist turns his gaze on himself, using his long-distance running to illuminate the changes to a human body over a lifetime

Part memoir, part scientific investigation, Racing the Clock is the book biologist and natural historian Bernd Heinrich has been waiting his entire life to write. A dedicated and accomplished marathon (and ultra-marathon) runner who won his first marathon at age 39, Heinrich looks deeply at running, aging, and the body, exploring the unresolved relationship between metabolism, diet, exercise, and age. Why do some bodies age differently than others? How much control do we have over that process, and what effect, if any, does being active have? 

Bringing to bear research from his entire career and in the spirit of his classic Why We Run, Heinrich probes the questions of how we use energy and continue to adapt to our mutable surroundings and circumstances. Beyond that, he examines how our bodies change while we age, but also how we can work with, if not overcome, many of these changes - and what all this tells us about evolution and the mechanisms of life, health, and happiness. 

Racing the Clock offers fascinating and surprising conclusions, all while bringing the listener along on Heinrich’s compelling journey to what he says will be his final race - a 50-kilometer race at age 80.  

©2021 Bernd Heinrich (P)2021 HarperCollins Publishers

What listeners say about Racing the Clock

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The creation is not the creator.

Not much about running, I understand his love for mother nature, I was expecting more saying about running, but this guy is preaching that God is nature, we must worship the creator not the creation even I agree with him that admiring mother nature give as a good glimpse to understand God greatness.

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essential reading

I can't even begin to offer enough superlatives to this book. It probably helps that I feel empathic connections to the writer, his interests, his struggles, his conclusions about life. But even had I had to struggle to connect with him or relate to him, nonetheless his story wonderfully conveys a rich and deep and full portrayal of what life is, or can be, if we but drop the bars of the cages we are all too likely to construct for ourselves if we follow the path most modern lifestyles entice us to adhere to. Read this book and taste the fulness of being fully human.

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Good Book, Decent Narration

I especially enjoyed the parts where Bernd reflected on connections between distance running and the aging process, a subject close to my heart as a 58yo distance runner. I also enjoyed the last couple of chapters, where he discovers trail ultras for the first time at age 79-80, and has a religious experience (trail ultras are all I've ever run, because being out in nature is my favorite part of running).

I did not always feel like the lines were delivered with the same inflection/emotional flavor that Bernd would have used if he were talking. The narration was not bad (I gave it 3 stars), but I sometimes wished I was reading instead so I could supply my own (imagined) voice tones.