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Publisher's Summary

College English professor Alison Bergeron thought that dating a cute NYPD detective like Bobby Crawford would be exciting and involve a lot of riding around in cruisers and putting away sleazy crooks, but he has yet to invite her on any stakeouts.... Then when a friend asks her to help him find his nephew, she goes to Bobby for advice only to find out that he already knows about the case. He pulled the boy out of the Hudson River a few days earlier. The boy’s employer calls it an accident, but Alison and Bobby aren’t convinced.

With matchmaking and sleuthing to spare, staying out of trouble isn’t on the syllabus when Alison and Bobby team up in Quick Study, Maggie Barbieri’s most outrageous outing yet.

©2008 Maggie Barbieri (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Professional narrator? Um...

...no. Seriously annoying voice with the most Valley Girl cadence since, well, ever. And her attempts at doing different accents is shudderingly bad and she often forgets which she assigned to which. So Bobby sometimes sounds like Max,etc.

The stories are better than the average cozy mystery though It gets that the author describes various things/people/etc as “...I’ve ever seen/heard/known/etc.” it’s a lazy way to describe something but once in awhile it can be effective. However, the author, in this book at least, uses it”more than anyone I’ve ever read/ known/heard of!” Often enough to be annoying.