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Publisher's Summary

With a new Afterword to the 2002 edition. No Logo employs journalistic savvy and personal testament to detail the insidious practices and far-reaching effects of corporate marketing—and the powerful potential of a growing activist sect that will surely alter the course of the 21st century. First published before the World Trade Organization protests in Seattle, this is an infuriating, inspiring, and altogether pioneering work of cultural criticism that investigates money, marketing, and the anti-corporate movement.

As global corporations compete for the hearts and wallets of consumers who not only buy their products but willingly advertise them from head to toe—witness today’s schoolbooks, superstores, sporting arenas, and brand-name synergy—a new generation has begun to battle consumerism with its own best weapons. In this provocative, well-written study, a front-line report on that battle, we learn how the Nike swoosh has changed from an athletic status-symbol to a metaphor for sweatshop labor, how teenaged McDonald’s workers are risking their jobs to join the Teamsters, and how “culture jammers” utilize spray paint, computer-hacking acumen, and anti-propagandist wordplay to undercut the slogans and meanings of billboard ads (as in “Joe Chemo” for “Joe Camel”).

No Logo will challenge and enlighten students of sociology, economics, popular culture, international affairs, and marketing.

"This book is not another account of the power of the select group of corporate Goliaths that have gathered to form our de facto global government. Rather, it is an attempt to analyze and document the forces opposing corporate rule, and to lay out the particular set of cultural and economic conditions that made the emergence of that opposition inevitable."
—Naomi Klein, from her Introduction

©2002 Naomi Klein (P)2012 Macmillan Audio

What listeners say about No Logo

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Irritating Over-Enunciated Narration

How could the performance have been better?

I wanted so much to listen to this book, but the narration makes it unlistenable. Why is there this trend toward extremely over-enunciated narration. It's irritating. Such an important book and it sounds as if a computer was used to tape it. Every single plosive t or p just popping like a pair of castanets . . ..

21 people found this helpful

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Serious topic undercut by terrible narration

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

I can't say, I had to stop listening in the first chapter due to the terrible narration.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Overly enunciated and totally the wrong "tenor" for this topic. This narrator would be good for reading childrens' stories or chick-lit, but not for a serious topic. Surely there were other female narrators who could have brought some heft to the material.

11 people found this helpful

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Informative

Whenever I read one of Naomi Klein's books, I find myself in a perpetual state anxiety and indignation about the injustice the powers that be (the 1%) force on people less fortunate than they are.

4 people found this helpful

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Brilliant Book Over Enunciated

Would you consider the audio edition of No Logo to be better than the print version?

No. In fact, I had to stop listening to the audio version and revert to the print version because the performance was so stilted.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Nicola Barber over enunciates every single word. Her reading has the effect of causing the listener to focus on her performance instead of what is being said. Really awful and very frustrating because this is an interesting book.

Any additional comments?

As always Naomi Klein has presented a well researched and fascinating report on a timely subject. She does great work. I recommend this title be read in the print version unless you can get past the reader's performance.

4 people found this helpful

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Narrator

I was eager to hear the content but found it painful to go through because of the narrator.

Her intonation and frequent inhalation degrades the quality of the experience..

6 people found this helpful

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Poor narrator choice

The content was interesting and compelling, but I thought the narrator was a bad choice. I was expecting more of a documentary-style journalist-type narrator for this subject matter. Instead, all I could hear was this woman's quick, loud inhales, and too-crisp annunciation. I couldn't finish it.

1 person found this helpful

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great insights to buy smarter

you will never look at Mac Donald's, Nike & Shell the same way! there is still hope in humanity

1 person found this helpful

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Important ideas with some minor delivery issues

I really enjoy Naomi Klein's lectures and have learned a lot from them so I went back to listen to this while I worked. The book does feel a bit quaint in its' references and scale now (talk of book store monopolies, the Internet in nascent form & guess jeans) but it all still applies with the names of players changed (in some cases not) and the markets expanded. Worth your time for the breakdown of companies shifting away from manufacturing product to persona, if nothing else, and there is a lot to be gleaned. Check it out if you want to get a sense of where American manufacturing jobs went and where your shirts come from.

The problem I had was a small one: the robotic phrasing of the narrator was distracting and when she read out colloquial terms it became comical. I don't mind her mispronouncing the name of portland's Willamette River but I found it derailed my listening when she would read out dated slang.

If that kind of thing bothers you, prepare yourself for a stilted listening experience. Otherwise, you'll be fine!

1 person found this helpful

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Still Relevant

This is a book I believe everyone should read/listen to as it is still relevant today. And probably even more now that the problems presented have gotten even worse with clinal capital, the environment & income inequality. The only dated content is devoted to companies or store concepts that no longer exist, but it’s still worth knowing their strategies and can probably even conclude their inevitable downfall after presented with the tactics used.

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Branding How Did I Miss Its Importance

I am not a follower of Popular Culture and I am too old to care about being popular or purchasing the in think. Not often influenced my movie stars or real estate moguls, sports Heroes or Teams. I did not watch soup operas or game shows. To be honest, I worked hard through the 1980’s and 1990’s and ignored the world of Branding. I was unaware that a person selling a product could make the product’s producer so much more money than just advertising its name and picture of that product. In the Ms. Klein’s newer book, written follow the Trump victory in 2016 of Donald Trump we see how Brandin his name lead to his victory. Klein refers back to the Brands like TRUMP that represent a person who failed to produce any successful products but learned to sell his name. I think all college students should read this book it is important to the political and economic developments of the 21st Century.