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Publisher's Summary

Let There Be Light presents a simple, beautiful, and elegant view of the oneness of all life, subjective and objective. It demonstrates the unity of the physical world with conscious experience of the physical world. Consciousness is not inside space and time, space and time are within consciousness; they are a special structure of the perceptual portion of consciousness.

Author Stephen Hage explores enigmas in physics which still exist and cannot be satisfactorily explained. He explains why the "Dimensional Structure" of consciousness is a new paradigm that can help us to better understand how the universe works - as Copernicus did when he shattered the myth that the sun orbits the earth, rather than the other way around.

Conversational and friendly, this audiobook presents a new myth and paradigm for understanding consciousness. It is intended to be a valuable resource for the intelligent lay person interested in the deep and meaningful connections between consciousness, physics, quantum mechanics, myth, and meditation.

©2013 Algora Press (P)2015 Wetware Media

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Eye opening

If you want to challenge your current reality and find a new comprehensive perspective for life and conciseness; read this book!

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Wonderful exciting ideas

I have finally found an author who disassembles the complex ideas and facts that is modern physics. He then reassembles the components one upon another building our understanding to a new level.
This is for anyone with a desire to comprehend our existence and how we relate to the universe.
Narration is perfect in tone, pace and emotion.

14 of 15 people found this review helpful

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Easy to understand

Very comprehensive narration of complicated concepts. Making good sense and logically sound. Like the book a lot.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Diana
  • Antelope Valley, CA, United States
  • 09-30-15

YES!!! Interesting, understandable, best one yet

After struggling through a few Consciousness books where physics and philosophy were the main focus, at last a book with more "aha!" moments than "banging-head-on-a-brick-wall" moments has been found.

Thank goodness!

These ideas are written by an author who has the ability to teach (make complex information understandable and even fun) and is narrated in a way that makes listening enjoyable.

The rapid evolution of humanity's consciousness is discussed with interesting points about radio, tv, computers, the internet, even Facebook. AI and nanotech . . . this author has fascinating observations about where humanity is now, how we got to this point, and probable future developments.

This book is going to be listened to again, then the "banging-head-on-a-brick-wall" books will be listened to again. Maybe next time the better foundation provided by this book will make the other books easier to understand . . . .

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Food for thought.

A great new concept on thinking, with a lot of research done to back the claims. although I'm not yet sure if I do intact believe in the dimensional structure of consciousness, it made me open my mind do a whole new world.

worth a read!

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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brilliant Research / Revolutionary

What made the experience of listening to Let There Be Light the most enjoyable?

Lucid insights into a complex subject... a lively discussion of the multidimensional reality we live in.

Stephen j. Hage has crafted a brilliant explanation of and insight into the multiplicity of dimensional experience and multiple dimensional realities. His clear definitions of realities and personal experience of the "observer" and the quantum world and the social and shared reality worlds as well as the subjective world all bring into perspective what I consider the best book ever written on this subject.

Defining quantum reality and still allowing the lay person to relate to personal experience while keeping a broad perspective on multiple realities and dimensions is an extremely complex challenge.

Hage has laid out in quite simple language the many worlds insights as well as the relative subjective observer paradox in a manner that deserve wide attention and applause literally.

Read this book.

What did you like best about this story?

all of it

Which character – as performed by Andrew Mulcare – was your favorite?

insights of author.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

The Evolving Realities.

Any additional comments?

Lucid insights into a complex subject... a lively discussion of the multidimensional reality we live in.

Stephen j. Hage has crafted a brilliant explanation of and insight into the multiplicity of dimensional experience and multiple dimensional realities. His clear definitions of realities and personal experience of the "observer" and the quantum world and the social and shared reality worlds as well as the subjective world all bring into perspective what I consider the best book ever written on this subject.

Defining quantum reality and still allowing the lay person to relate to personal experience while keeping a broad perspective on multiple realities and dimensions is an extremely complex challenge.

Hage has laid out in quite simple language the many worlds insights as well as the relative subjective observer paradox in a manner that deserve wide attention and applause literally.

Read this book.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Better than I expected.

Bridges physics and philosophy nicely and Andrew Mulcare's performance is very good. If you're interested in either topic I would recommend giving this book a chance could be a rewarding experience.

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

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Synonyms are only good to a point

If you could sum up Let There Be Light in three words, what would they be?

Great book!

What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

Provides ample opportunity for extrapolation of popular thoughts and ideas.

What about Andrew Mulcare’s performance did you like?

Can also be used, in part, for basic contemplative meditations if you can tolerate the "lists" of examples that were often tediously long.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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Pastiche

Going round and round to say sth that could have been said in a pop magazine article...

5 of 16 people found this review helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

arrogant and wanky

tedious and boring. he self-importantly creates his own lingo, then expects everyine else to see the world through his own intellectual superiority. Almost no discussion of real science.

3 of 11 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Francis
  • 04-18-16

Fantasy Physics

What did you like best about Let There Be Light? What did you like least?

Starts off strongly, introduces well the mind-boggling perplexity of Quantum Physics.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

After a strong start, author throws in a chapter about meditation. Alarm bells. Later chapters are more of a rambling sermon than proper exposition of the author's proposed 'myth'.to replace the Cartesian model of the universe. I got well lost. I've nothing against the author trying to come up with a theory to explain the universe, but if it can't be expressed in easier language than this - at times it is almost wilfully obscure - then I'm afraid it has very little chance of success. If you are the author and you see this - may I suggest - ditch the meditation chapter and instead take the time to explain your screens more coherently and in shorter sentences (it's hard to listen to long sentences that go in and of and around the thing that was once referred to having past it on and in and of the earlier part of this sentence, for example).

What didn’t you like about Andrew Mulcare’s performance?

Often sounded bored. Intonation completely wrong at times (e.g. under-pinings instead of underpinnings).made clumsy sentence structure even harder to grasp.Partly I think reader not to blame because you need to understand the material to know where best to pause and take a breath, and not many will have the time to understand the material. Probably better to get the author himself to perform it, Once he's re-written it.

If this book were a film would you go see it?

Absolutely not. Silly question for this kind of book.

0 of 7 people found this review helpful